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Subject: How to freeze roasted potatoes?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Angela Faye Oon 
Date: Sun, 9 Dec 2001 01:23:49 +0800
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I read on a recipe site that a woman freezes her oven-roasted rosemary
potatoes and says that they are great when re-heated. I love roast potatoes,
but they take quite some time to prepare, so the idea of freezing for eating
later really appeals to me. However, I have two queries:

1) Do potatoes freeze well? I read on another thread here that potatoes in a
stew form a "skin" and become awful, etc. when frozen and thawed again. Does
this apply for roasted new potatoes?

2) I roast my potatoes in a lot of butter *blush*. Can butter be frozen?
Doesn't fat turn rancid quickly?

Hope the experts out there could jump in with some answers -
TIA
Angela

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From: Nancy Young 
Date: Sat, 08 Dec 2001 13:20:25 -0500
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Angela Faye Oon wrote:
> 2) I roast my potatoes in a lot of butter *blush*. Can butter be frozen?
> Doesn't fat turn rancid quickly?

Butter freezes very well, I keep mine in the freezer with a stick in 
the refrigerator.  Buy it on sale and freeze it, no problem.

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 08 Dec 2001 19:33:54 GMT
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Nancy Young writes:
>Butter freezes very well, I keep mine in the freezer with a stick in 
>the refrigerator.

On the other hand though, potatoes do not freeze well.

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From: judgmoore[at]cs.com (Judith Moore)
Date: 08 Dec 2001 20:17:30 GMT
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Angela Faye Oon wrote:
>1) Do potatoes freeze well? I read on another thread here that potatoes in a
>stew form a "skin" and become awful, etc. when frozen and thawed again. Does
>this apply for roasted new potatoes?

Judging by the number of potato things in the grocery store's frozen section,
I'd say pieces the size of 'wedges' on down, with thoroughly cooked outside
surfaces must be quite freezable indeed. 

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 08 Dec 2001 22:45:44 GMT
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Judith Moore writes:
>Judging by the number of potato things in the grocery store's frozen section,
>I'd say pieces the size of 'wedges' on down, with thoroughly cooked outside
>surfaces must be quite freezable indeed. 

The potatoes found in the frozen foods section are of many different
*configurations* but are all of the same genre; process-fried... and none of
those maintains a texture (or flavor) equal to that of never-frozen fries.

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From: Arri London 
Date: Sat, 08 Dec 2001 20:57:12 -0700
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Judith Moore wrote:
> Judging by the number of potato things in the grocery store's frozen section,
> I'd say pieces the size of 'wedges' on down, with thoroughly cooked outside
> surfaces must be quite freezable indeed.

But I think the potatoes are handled in a very different
manner than a home cook could. Not to mention possibly being
subjected to chemical treatments the home cook wouldn't use.

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From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Sun, 09 Dec 2001 04:25:02 GMT
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Arri London wrote:
> But I think the potatoes are handled in a very different
> manner than a home cook could. Not to mention possibly being
> subjected to chemical treatments the home cook wouldn't use.

If I'm not mistaken, I believe that commercially frozen potatoes are 
"flash" frozen at many degrees below zero in a partial vacuum.  This 
simply isn't possible with domestic freezing equipment.

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From: Pat Meadows 
Date: Sat, 08 Dec 2001 20:54:25 GMT
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Angela Faye Oon wrote:
>I read on a recipe site that a woman freezes her oven-roasted rosemary
>potatoes and says that they are great when re-heated. 

I just flat don't believe she freezes oven-roasted rosemary
potatoes and that they are great when reheated.  I think
it's a fib.  Or her idea of 'great' is very different from
mine.

In my experience, potatoes turn into horrid cardboard when
frozen.  Horrid texture, no taste.  

This is applicable to both home-frozen potatoes and
commercial ones.  I think the commercial ones are horrid
too.

If I HAD to eat frozen potatoes, mashed potatoes freeze
better than others, but still not very well.
Pat

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From: Vinny Marinara 
Date: Sat, 8 Dec 2001 21:03:50 -0500
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If the woman on the recipe site says she freezes this recipe with success, I
am unsure as to why you're questioning it.  Use the type of potato she used.
Follow the recipe.  It's obviously worked for someone, why not you?  You can
freeze butter--it STOPS it from going rancid.  I buy butter on sale and
freeze it.

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From: stan[at]temple.edu
Date: 14 Dec 2001 20:54:18 GMT
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Vinny Marinara wrote:
> If the woman on the recipe site says she freezes this recipe with success, I
> am unsure as to why you're questioning it.  Use the type of potato she used.
> Follow the recipe.  It's obviously worked for someone, why not you?  You can
> freeze butter--it STOPS it from going rancid.  I buy butter on sale and
> freeze it.

Me too. The person who raised the question about freezing roasted potatoes
can certainly try doing it herself and see what happens. She is in a far
better position to determine if she'll like the thawed reheated potatoes
than anyone else certainly is since taste is a purely personal thing.


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