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Subject: Mold on Potato Ok?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Stressed 
Date: 8 May 2005 14:59:54 -0700
--------
If you scrub the mold off of a potato, is it ok to eat? I say no, my
husband thinks it's alright. Thank you.

============================

From: Dee Randall 
Date: Sun, 8 May 2005 18:10:07 -0400
--------
I wouldn't eat it myself -- however, I even cover my potatoes from daylight 
to keep them from becoming green, so be guided accordingly.  What's a potato 
cost -- probably less than something you might discard on your plate because 
you're too full to eat it.

============================

From: Stressed 
Date: 9 May 2005 09:51:08 -0700
--------
Sorry, I should have been more clear. It wasn't green, it was patches
of black stuff, I thought that was mold. I always thought the green was
from exposure to sun, I'm glad to know that's true. Does anyone know
about black patches on potatoes?

Cost of more potatoes wouldn't be a problem, but time was. We live in
the middle of nowhere, so we couldn't just run out to the store. The
potatoes were to be a special Mothers Day treat for me. He bought me
the largest one he could find. It was going to be baked, piled high
with real butter, real sour cream and full fat cheese. I eat this maybe
twice a year. We will be going out to dinner in August, I think I will
have one then.

============================

From: Dee Randall 
Date: Mon, 9 May 2005 13:05:31 -0400
--------
Stressed wrote:
> Sorry, I should have been more clear. It wasn't green, it was patches
> of black stuff, I thought that was mold.

I've always wondered what this black discoloration is on potatoes that been 
boiled or peeled-and-baked and let set in the refrigerator overnight (to use 
the next morning for frying). This black discoloration wasn't there when 
they came out of the oven or boiling water.
Any ideas? Or is this another question I'll pose at the Pearly Gates?

============================

From: Shaun aRe 
Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 15:27:48 +0100
--------
Dee Randall wrote:
> I've always wondered what this black discoloration is on potatoes that been
> boiled or peeled-and-baked and let set in the refrigerator overnight (to use
> the next morning for frying). This black discoloration wasn't there when
> they came out of the oven or boiling water.

Enzymatic degradation of starches perhaps? I know at least a lot of starches
blacken with exposure to oxygen or other oxidising substances. I do know
it's harmless, mind you.

============================

From: Shaun aRe 
Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 15:29:52 +0100
--------
Stressed wrote:
> Sorry, I should have been more clear. It wasn't green, it was patches
> of black stuff, I thought that was mold. I always thought the green was
> from exposure to sun, I'm glad to know that's true. Does anyone know
> about black patches on potatoes?

If it was a fresh, unpeeled potato, and the black was on the skin itself,
then yes, likely it was just a surface mold, probably a mildew of sorts - I
would have no problem eating the potato if it were peeled to white and
washed first, none at all.

============================

From: Peter Aitken 
Date: Sun, 08 May 2005 22:41:56 GMT
--------
Stressed wrote:
> If you scrub the mold off of a potato, is it ok to eat? I say no, my
> husband thinks it's alright. Thank you.

Is the skin turning green? That's not mold but a nrmal part of potato 
development. See http://ianrpubs.unl.edu/horticulture/g1437.htm  for more 
info.

============================

From: aem 
Date: 8 May 2005 16:31:20 -0700
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
> Is the skin turning green? That's not mold but a nrmal part of potato
> development. See http://ianrpubs.unl.edu/horticulture/g1437.htm  for more
> info.

It may be normal development, but it's best not to eat potatoes that
turn green.  They are mildly toxic to most people.  If you cut away the
green part, cut well beyond where the green is visible.    -aem

============================

From: Food For Thought 
Date: 8 May 2005 19:36:30 -0700
--------
aem wrote:
>It may be normal development, but it's best not to eat potatoes that
>turn green

You quoted a post with a link you obviously didn't read.  ;-)

============================

From: aem 
Date: 10 May 2005 09:47:36 -0700
--------
Food For Thought wrote:
> You quoted a post with a link you obviously didn't read.  ;-)

Oh horseshit.  The original question had already been answered.  I
commented on the drift.    -aem

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: 10 May 2005 07:45:44 -0700
--------
Stressed wrote:
> If you scrub the mold off of a potato, is it ok to eat? I say no, my
> husband thinks it's alright. Thank you.

Potatoes are subject to myriad diseases.

A common tuber disease is Rhizoctonia or black scurf. This fungal
disease is characterized by small, irregular black patches on the tuber
surface. These patches, called "sclerotia," look just like dried-on
soil. Unlike soil, however, these patches won't rinse off easily.

Simply peel and use.

============================

From: Shaun aRe 
Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 16:24:17 +0100
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Potatoes are subject to myriad diseases.
>
> A common tuber disease is Rhizoctonia or black scurf. This fungal
> disease is characterized by small, irregular black patches on the tuber
> surface. These patches, called "sclerotia,"

Are you *certain* you have the right word there?

"n. pl. scle·ro·ti·a (-sh-, -sh)
  A dense mass of branched hyphae, as in certain fungi, that contain stored
food and are capable of remaining dormant for long periods.

  [New Latin, from Greek sklrots, hardness, from sklros, hard.]"

Truffles are sclerotia.

Shaun aRe - Bit of a fungiphile.

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: 10 May 2005 09:37:31 -0700
--------
Shaun aRe: Dimwit scrawled:

> Are you *certain* you have the right word there?

Are you *certain* you have the correct reference there... dictionarys
are notoriously worthless for abstractions.

> "n. pl. scle·ro·ti·a (-sh-, -sh)
>   A dense mass of branched hyphae, as in certain fungi, that contain stored
> food and are capable of remaining dormant for long periods.
>
>   [New Latin, from Greek sklrots, hardness, from sklros, hard.]"
>
> Truffles are sclerotia.

Uni-dimensional thinking... can't even comprehend his own reference...
did anyone ever tell you that you are functionally illiterate, you are
you know, most definitely... you've just demonstated that you have the
IQ of a potato, mashed.  You're way too dumb to succeed at being a LOUD
MOUTH.  I'm positive yours is the lowest IQ of all who've subscribed to
rfc during the past five year period.  Typical internet/usenet Newbie,
with hair trigger keyboard.  Didn't yer momma teach you to put
pea-brain into gear before opening yap.  Had only you'd known how to do
an internet search for . DUH

There's a 'zillion' of em:

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/plymouth/pubs/scurf.html

http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/factsheets/Potato_Rhizoctonia.htm

Sheldon (grows/knows spuds)

============================

From: Shaun aRe 
Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 15:21:06 +0100
--------
Sheldon wrote:

> "Uni-dimensional thinking... can't even comprehend his own reference..."

My question of you was not an accusation, it was a request for
clarification. The mold you described jarred with the definition of
sclerotia I had come across - I wanted to be sure you used the right word in
that context, so that I could ad that information to memory and therefore
broaden my knowledge base.

Now, if of course you would care to, could you explain how the above applies
to this potato mold? I really am genuinely curious - as I said previously,
I'm a bit of a (admittedly very amateur) fungiphile.

"did anyone ever tell you that you are functionally illiterate, you are
you know, most definitely... you've just demonstated that you have the
IQ of a potato, mashed.  You're way too dumb to succeed at being a LOUD
MOUTH.  I'm positive yours is the lowest IQ of all who've subscribed to
rfc during the past five year period."

No Sheldon, only you, but it's more or less the same formulaic response you
fire off to people here on a reagular basis, and it doesn't bother me in the
least. ',;~}~

I must admit though to being a little upset, that you didn't even put in one
half of a new thought before you attempted your (f)laming of me. 
;-(


  "Typical internet/usenet Newbie,
with hair trigger keyboard."

Ha! Hilarious - I ask you a question, you fire off (as you so often do) your
little tirade, then accuse me of having a hair trigger keyboard. You do
realise the irony of that, don't you Shelly-Welly?

"Didn't yer momma teach you to put
pea-brain into gear before opening yap."

 If only she'd have been your mother too, maybe she would have also
taught you to do such.

 "Had only you'd known how to do
an internet search for . DUH"

> There's a 'zillion' of em:
>
> http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/plymouth/pubs/scurf.html
>
> http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/factsheets/Potato_Rhizoctonia.htm

Thanks for the links - I will take a look at them shortly - I'm sure I will
find the information both interesting and informative. However if I do not,
I will come right back here and mercilessly flame the living shit out of you
of course, but surely you would expect no less of me, nor would I expect you
to give any less were the tables turned. ',;~}~

> "Sheldon (grows/knows spuds)"

Good for you! We grow them too, only for ourselves mind you, but we do
rather well.

While this is on my mind, may I pick yours for a little information
regarding growing potatoes?

We were told (rather my wife was while studying horticulture) not to waste
our time and money buying commercial 'seed potatoes' (we're only talking
small grows here, allotment grows etc. if this makes a difference), rather
to just buy the kind we liked at a s/market, and plant those when they went
to seed. He gave her his reasons, and since then, experimenting has backed
up that reasoning.

Various types of commercial seed potatoes, planted at different times and
different locations, when compared to store bought ones in the same
situations, yielded comparatively poorly, suffered much more from disease,
and were attacked rather heavily by pests. The crops were also poorer in
flavour (with the crops from the store bought having vastly more flavour
than the originals too).

Could you, if you please, elucidate as to why this is/maybe, and also, with
the above (at least seemingly) being the case, why do people still buy
expensive seed potatoes?

Cheers!

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: 11 May 2005 07:49:26 -0700
--------
Shaun aRe wrote:
> Various types of commercial seed potatoes, planted at different times and
> different locations, when compared to store bought ones in the same
> situations, yielded comparatively poorly, suffered much more from disease,
> and were attacked rather heavily by pests. The crops were also poorer in
> flavour (with the crops from the store bought having vastly more flavour
> than the originals too).
>
> Could you, if you please, elucidate as to why this is/maybe, and also, with
> the above (at least seemingly) being the case, why do people still buy
> expensive seed potatoes?

You're likely a cheap bastard and other folks are not...

Seed potatoes are treated with fungicides, insecticides, and hormones
to accelerate initial growth... as are most all veggie seed.  Do not
eat or feed wildlife leftover veggie seed.   Seed potatoes are not more
costly... and those from the stupidmarket are generally hybrids that
won't reproduce.

Small home gardens are not to save money, almost always costs more than
store bought... it's a hobby... I just added 15 yds of topsoil @ $400,
I'm already operating at a loss and I didn't even plant yet, first
gotta start up my $800 rototiller - it will never pay for itself.  I've
been gardening all my life and have yet to save my first penny, have no
expectations I ever will.

============================

From: Shaun aRe 
Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 16:24:40 +0100
--------
Sheldon wrote:

> You're likely a cheap bastard and other folks are not...

Did you actually read the above? It was a lecturer in horticulture that made
the suggestion, and when experiments were carried out, the results bore him
out. This isn't conjecture, it isn't anecdote, it is personal experience.

> Seed potatoes are treated with fungicides, insecticides, and hormones
> to accelerate initial growth... as are most all veggie seed.

Duh.

> Do not
> eat or feed wildlife leftover veggie seed.

Well no shit Sherlock - give the man a fucking shiny foil prize, sheesh...

> Seed potatoes are not more
> costly...

Oh, and you're in England now are you? I can tell you in no uncertain terms,
seed potatoes in all the places we've seen over here are in the region of 5x
the price, not w/w, but potato for potato.

> and those from the stupidmarket are generally hybrids that
> won't reproduce.

Which is why we manage to harvest heaps of potatoes grown from them each
year I suppose.

> Small home gardens are not to save money, almost always costs more than
> store bought... it's a hobby...

I know it's a hobby, it just so happens we prefer the potatoes we grow to
those we buy, and *it also just so happens* they cost us virtually nothing
but fertile ground.

> I just added 15 yds of topsoil @ $400,
> I'm already operating at a loss and I didn't even plant yet, first
> gotta start up my $800 rototiller - it will never pay for itself.  I've
> been gardening all my life and have yet to save my first penny, have no
> expectations I ever will.

Diddums.

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: 11 May 2005 07:57:38 -0700
--------
Shaun aRe wrote:
>
> "Uni-dimensional thinking... can't even comprehend his own reference..."
>
> My question of you was not an accusation, it was a request for
> clarification. The mold you described jarred with the definition of
> sclerotia I had come across - I wanted to be sure you used the right word in
> that context, so that I could ad that information to memory and therefore
> broaden my knowledge base.
>
> Now, if of course you would care to, could you explain how the above applies
> to this potato mold? I really am genuinely curious - as I said previously,
> I'm a bit of a (admittedly very amateur) fungiphile.
>
> "did anyone ever tell you that you are functionally illiterate, you are
> you know, most definitely... you've just demonstated that you have the
> IQ of a potato, mashed.  You're way too dumb to succeed at being a LOUD
> MOUTH.  I'm positive yours is the lowest IQ of all who've subscribed to
> rfc during the past five year period."
>
> No Sheldon, only you, but it's more or less the same formulaic response you
> fire off to people here on a reagular basis, and it doesn't bother me in the
> least. ',;~}~
>
> I must admit though to being a little upset, that you didn't even put in one
> half of a new thought before you attempted your (f)laming of me. 
> ;-(
>
>
>   "Typical internet/usenet Newbie,
> with hair trigger keyboard."
>
> Ha! Hilarious - I ask you a question, you fire off (as you so often do) your
> little tirade, then accuse me of having a hair trigger keyboard. You do
> realise the irony of that, don't you Shelly-Welly?
>
> "Didn't yer momma teach you to put
> pea-brain into gear before opening yap."
>
>  If only she'd have been your mother too, maybe she would have also
> taught you to do such.
>
>  "Had only you'd known how to do
> an internet search for . DUH"
>
> There's a 'zillion' of em:
>
> http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/plymouth/pubs/scurf.html
>
>
http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/factsheets/Potato_Rhizoctonia.htm
>
> Thanks for the links - I will take a look at them shortly - I'm sure I will
> find the information both interesting and informative.

Had you actually possessed an IQ you'd have checked out those websites,
etal, BEFORE overflowing yer yap... you haven't what it takes to
learn... I meet your type nearly every day... losers who dive into the
pool without looking because they think they know *everything*.  I can
always pick out the brain dead, they have to respond to EVERY thread.

============================

Subject: Re: Mold on Potato Ok?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
From: "Shaun aRe" 
Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 16:26:19 +0100
--------

"Sheldon"  wrote in message
news:1115823458.854764.96290@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

Shaun aRe wrote:

> > > A common tuber disease is Rhizoctonia or black scurf. This fungal
> > > disease is characterized by small, irregular black patches on the
> tuber
> > > surface. These patches, called "sclerotia,"
> >
> > Are you *certain* you have the right word there?
>
> "Are you *certain* you have the correct reference there...
dictionarys
> are notoriously worthless for abstractions."
>
> Yes, I'm certain I have the definition correct.
> > "n. pl. scle·ro·ti·a (-sh-, -sh)
> >   A dense mass of branched hyphae, as in certain fungi, that
contain
> stored
> > food and are capable of remaining dormant for long periods.
> >
> >   [New Latin, from Greek sklrots, hardness, from sklros, hard.]"
> >
> > Truffles are sclerotia.
>
> "Uni-dimensional thinking... can't even comprehend his own
reference..."
>
> My question of you was not an accusation, it was a request for
> clarification. The mold you described jarred with the definition of
> sclerotia I had come across - I wanted to be sure you used the right
word in
> that context, so that I could ad that information to memory and
therefore
> broaden my knowledge base.
>
> Now, if of course you would care to, could you explain how the above
applies
> to this potato mold? I really am genuinely curious - as I said
previously,
> I'm a bit of a (admittedly very amateur) fungiphile.
>
> "did anyone ever tell you that you are functionally illiterate, you
are
> you know, most definitely... you've just demonstated that you have
the
> IQ of a potato, mashed.  You're way too dumb to succeed at being a
LOUD
> MOUTH.  I'm positive yours is the lowest IQ of all who've subscribed
to
> rfc during the past five year period."
>
> No Sheldon, only you, but it's more or less the same formulaic
response you
> fire off to people here on a reagular basis, and it doesn't bother me
in the
> least. ',;~}~
>
> I must admit though to being a little upset, that you didn't even put
in one
> half of a new thought before you attempted your (f)laming of me.

> ;-(
>
>
>   "Typical internet/usenet Newbie,
> with hair trigger keyboard."
>
> Ha! Hilarious - I ask you a question, you fire off (as you so often
do) your
> little tirade, then accuse me of having a hair trigger keyboard. You
do
> realise the irony of that, don't you Shelly-Welly?
>
> "Didn't yer momma teach you to put
> pea-brain into gear before opening yap."
>
>  If only she'd have been your mother too, maybe she would have
also
> taught you to do such.
>
>  "Had only you'd known how to do
> an internet search for . DUH"
>
> There's a 'zillion' of em:
>
> http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/plymouth/pubs/scurf.html
>
>
http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/factsheets/Potato_Rhizoctonia.htm
>
> Thanks for the links - I will take a look at them shortly - I'm sure
I will
> find the information both interesting and informative.

Had you actually possessed an IQ you'd have checked out those websites,
etal, BEFORE overflowing yer yap... you haven't what it takes to
learn... I meet your type nearly every day... losers who dive into the
pool without looking because they think they know *everything*.  I can
always pick out the brain dead, they have to respond to EVERY thread.

Sheldon



============================

Subject: Re: Mold on Potato Ok?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
From: "Shaun aRe" 
Date: Wed, 11 May 2005 16:31:31 +0100
--------

"Sheldon"  wrote in message
news:1115823458.854764.96290@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...



>  I can always pick out the brain

You certainly picked your own out Shelly. Did you throw it on your hobby
gardner's compost heap with the rotten sprouts then? If you'd had even half
an ounce of forethought you'd have replaced it with one of those sprouts
before they rotted completely and vastly improved your quality of life.

You're nothing but an ignorant, opinionated filthy, big-mouthed,
cock-sucking gutter-whore, and what's more, you obviously already know and
revel in that fact.


Cheers!


Shaun aRe



============================

Subject: Re: Mold on Potato Ok?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
From: "aem" 
Date: 11 May 2005 10:04:33 -0700
--------
Shaun aRe wrote:
>  [big snip]
> Various types of commercial seed potatoes, planted at different times
> and different locations, when compared to store bought ones in the
> same situations, yielded comparatively poorly, suffered much more
> from disease, and were attacked rather heavily by pests. The crops
> were also poorer in flavour (with the crops from the store bought
> having vastly more flavour than the originals too).  [snip]

Just in case you're actually looking for information and not just
entertaining yourself with Sheldon, I'll say that I think your
experience is the exception rather than the rule.  At least it is the
opposite of our experience.  We have planted both seed potatoes and
store bought ones as you did, but we found that the seed potatoes were
significantly more productive and less subject to pests.  I will say
that the store bought ones were actually from a farmers market and sold
as "organic" so they likely had no pesticides, but then the seed
potatoes weren't supposed to be 'treated' either.  In both cases they
were not ordinary russets or white boiling varieties.  Some were
'Russian' fingerlings, some were purple.  Potatoes take a lot of space
and a lot of patience, but it is quite fun to harvest them and the
quality of a truly 'new' potato is unbeatable.  At this week's farmers
market I'll ask the guys at the potato stand for their opinion on this.
 If they say anything useful I'll post it.   -aem


============================

Subject: Re: Mold on Potato Ok?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
From: "Shaun aRe" 
Date: Thu, 12 May 2005 13:17:34 +0100
--------

"aem"  wrote in message
news:1115831073.939784.144840@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Shaun aRe wrote:
> >  [big snip]
> > Various types of commercial seed potatoes, planted at different times
> > and different locations, when compared to store bought ones in the
> > same situations, yielded comparatively poorly, suffered much more
> > from disease, and were attacked rather heavily by pests. The crops
> > were also poorer in flavour (with the crops from the store bought
> > having vastly more flavour than the originals too).  [snip]
>
> Just in case you're actually looking for information and not just
> entertaining yourself with Sheldon,

 Who me? Trolling trolls? Idonknowhatchoomean... 

Actually, yes - I was looking for answers to those particular questions,
thanks.

> I'll say that I think your
> experience is the exception rather than the rule.  At least it is the
> opposite of our experience.

This is getting strange indeed!

> We have planted both seed potatoes and
> store bought ones as you did, but we found that the seed potatoes were
> significantly more productive and less subject to pests.

Hmmm, Kath's (my wife) all suffered terribly from being eaten alive, each
time (seed sourced from different places too) and yielded poorly anyway. The
store bought ones have been almost unstoppable! We actually have a lot with
another crop nearly ready, just from the few spuds we missed when we dug out
last winter - there's probably about half as many plants growing as we
planted last time (the lot has just been left as we've got other projects
underway, like out new polytunnel, some reorganising, and a big herb garden
being built). The ones we put into the greenhouse soil bed during winter
have exploded upwards and outwards and are VERY ready to be dug out now...
strange!

> I will say
> that the store bought ones were actually from a farmers market and sold
> as "organic" so they likely had no pesticides, but then the seed
> potatoes weren't supposed to be 'treated' either.  In both cases they
> were not ordinary russets or white boiling varieties.

These are just some pretty ordinary white potatoes this time, as they were
the last, but they taste far from the ordinary spuds they started as, when
we get them out - they seemingly always turn out *far* superior to the store
ones.

> Some were
> 'Russian' fingerlings, some were purple.  Potatoes take a lot of space
> and a lot of patience, but it is quite fun to harvest them and the
> quality of a truly 'new' potato is unbeatable.

You're telling me! We grow them every year, 1, 2 or 3 different times, and
my wife did the same for years before we met. Can't beat digging them up,
taking them home, washing, cooking and serving with lashings of locally
produced small batch ultra creamy butter... : ',;~}~

> At this week's farmers
> market I'll ask the guys at the potato stand for their opinion on this.
>  If they say anything useful I'll post it.   -aem

Thank you muchly - I'd really like the low down on all this.

Cheers!

Shaun aRe
--
May all your wishes be both wise and fulfilled.




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