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Subject: Baking Powder in Mashed Potatoes?? [and sub-thread]
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2007 20:22:15 -0500
--------
I picked up a nice bag of russet potatoes today while at Sam's. The 
brand name was Del Monte. On the back were "tips" on various methods of 
use and one of the tips was that while making mashed potatoes, adding a 
teaspoon of baking powder makes them "fluffier". Huh?? I've never heard 
of such a thing... has anyone else?

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2007 01:51:41 GMT
--------
No, and it sounds strange. 

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 19 Jan 2007 03:21:35 GMT
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> No, and it sounds strange. 

Seems it's not that strange.....

http://www.google.com.au/search?q=baking+powder+in+mashed+potatoes

The BP does make them fluffier........ I'l have to give it a whirl some 
time.

That Baking Powder is *amazing* stuff, isn't it?

============================

From: Reg 
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2007 20:23:18 -0800
--------
Peter Lucas wrote:
> The BP does make them fluffier........ I'l have to give it a whirl some 
> time.

If you haven't tried it how do you know?

> That Baking Powder is *amazing* stuff, isn't it?

I can't see how it would make a difference. Baking powder gives off
CO2 gas. That would only make something lighter if the medium it's
in would tend to trap and hold in the gas.

In the case of something with flour in it, the flour (via
gluten) forms little bubble shaped chambers to trap
the gas. In the case of mashed potatoes there's no gluten
network to trap the gas.

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 19 Jan 2007 04:50:21 GMT
--------
Reg wrote:
> If you haven't tried it how do you know?

Did you bother reading any of the link??

Have *you* tried BP in mashed potato?

If you haven't, how would you know it doesn't?

> I can't see how it would make a difference. 

*Read* the links!!!!

Besides which, I was making comment on the *hundreds* of different uses 
that Baking Powder has.

http://frugalliving.about.com/cs/tips/a/blbakingsoda1.htm

http://www.allthingsfrugal.com/b_soda.htm

http://www.bellybytes.com/articles/bakingsoda.shtml

http://www.bakingsodabook.co.uk/Use_baking_soda_instead_of_scouring_powder.shtml

============================

From: Reg 
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2007 21:12:06 -0800
--------
Peter Lucas wrote:

> Did you bother reading any of the link??

Of course, but they don't actually prove anything. You can
find all sorts of recipes that contain ingredients, techniques,
etc, based on one myth or another.

> Have *you* tried BP in mashed potato?
> 
> If you haven't, how would you know it doesn't?

I never said I know it doesn't work. You, on the other
hand, said you know it does though you haven't actually
tried it.

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 19 Jan 2007 05:34:43 GMT
--------
Reg wrote:
> I never said I know it doesn't work. You, on the other
> hand, said you know it does though you haven't actually
> tried it.

No, I 'said' (based on the info supplied in the links) that it does 
(apparently) make the mash fluffier.

Not knowing for sure, I'm going to give it a whirl next time I do a 
mash.

Does that please the resident pedant?

============================

From: Reg 
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2007 21:50:03 -0800
--------
Peter Lucas wrote:

> No, I 'said' (based on the info supplied in the links) that it does 
> (apparently) make the mash fluffier.

You're (parenthetically) adding to what you (actually) said,
but that's fine.

> Not knowing for sure, I'm going to give it a whirl next time I do a 
> mash.
> 
> Does that please the resident pedant?

It's a good thing to question what you hear and read, especially
if it doesn't make sense.

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 19 Jan 2007 06:28:20 GMT
--------
Reg wrote:

> You're (parenthetically) adding to what you (actually) said,
> but that's fine.

It was to let you know what was 'implied'. You seem to be the only one 
with a problem with it. Why?

> It's a good thing to question what you hear and read, especially
> if it doesn't make sense.

You can add Baking Powder to your scrambled eggs, and they make them 
fluffier (and yes, I have done this), so what wouldn't make sense in 
adding it to mashed potato?

Be adventurous for once, instead of "What if.... what if.... what if".

Give it a whirl and come back to us with your opinion.

============================

From: Reg 
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2007 23:34:22 -0800
--------
Peter Lucas wrote:

> You can add Baking Powder to your scrambled eggs, and they make them 
> fluffier (and yes, I have done this), so what wouldn't make sense in 
> adding it to mashed potato?
> 
> Be adventurous for once, instead of "What if.... what if.... what if".

See, you're the one who's baiting here. I'm simply discussing
the topic.

> Give it a whirl and come back to us with your opinion.

Scrambled eggs are a poor analogy. Eggs start out as a liquid
and then set when heated. The C02 bubbles created by the baking
powder in the liquid are trapped when the eggs are cooked, making
the result lighter. Eggs solidify and trap the gas in a manner
similar to baked goods. Mashed potatoes are fluid.

I don't know whether or not baking powder actually makes
mashed potatoes lighter, but the scrambled eggs analogy
doesn't apply.

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 19 Jan 2007 16:41:04 GMT
--------
Reg wrote:
> Scrambled eggs are a poor analogy. Eggs start out as a liquid
> and then set when heated. The C02 bubbles created by the baking
> powder in the liquid are trapped when the eggs are cooked, making
> the result lighter. Eggs solidify and trap the gas in a manner
> similar to baked goods. Mashed potatoes are fluid.
> 
> I don't know whether or not baking powder actually makes
> mashed potatoes lighter, but the scrambled eggs analogy
> doesn't apply.

Run around in circles all you want. You're going to be doing it by 
yourself.

Get your head out of your arse, be adventurous, and try it. 

If you don't want to...... fine. Just shut the hell up.

============================

From: Reg 
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2007 09:02:05 -0800
--------
Peter Lucas wrote:
> Run around in circles all you want. You're going to be doing it by 
> yourself.
> 
> Get your head out of your arse, be adventurous, and try it. 

I have and it's not a very good method.

For lighter style eggs I prefer to separate the whites, whip
them, and fold them back in with the yolks. It makes for a much
better result than adding baking powder.

> If you don't want to...... fine. Just shut the hell up.

Still throwing a tantrum over nothing. My guess at this point
is that you're actually a small child.

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2007 01:46:49 +0100 (CET)
--------
Reg wrote:
> I have and it's not a very good method.
> 
> For lighter style eggs I prefer to separate the whites, whip
> them, and fold them back in with the yolks. It makes for a much
> better result than adding baking powder.

The original point of this thread was to ascertain if BP in mashed 
potatos was done at all. It has been ascertained that it can be done, 
and is done by some people.

It was also pointed out that some people, for whatever the reason, add 
BP to their scrambled eggs. I tried it as an experiment, and it worked.

I don't do it all the time. My scrambled eggs are just fine.

>> If you don't want to...... fine. Just shut the hell up.
> 
> Still throwing a tantrum over nothing. 

Not at all. It exasperates me that someone of your supposed 
'intelligence' can have this "head up the ass attitude" and not see the 
forest for the trees.

Baking powder *can* be used for many things. One of them is to add to 
mashed potato.

If you don't want to do it, fine. Just don't keep gobbing off about how 
wonderful your cooking prowess is and poo-pooing any "non-purist" 
cooking method.

>My guess at this point
> is that you're actually a small child.

A bit of self projection, I see.

============================

From: Reg 
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2007 02:27:12 GMT
--------
Peter Lucas wrote:
> Not at all. It exasperates me that someone of your supposed 
> 'intelligence' can have this "head up the ass attitude" and not see the 
> forest for the trees.
> 
> Baking powder *can* be used for many things. One of them is to add to 
> mashed potato.
> 
> If you don't want to do it, fine. Just don't keep gobbing off about how 
> wonderful your cooking prowess is and poo-pooing any "non-purist" 
> cooking method.

Uh, no. It was others that suggested it might not taste very good.
With good reason. I simply questioned whether it would actually
work or not.

You're alone on this one, I'm afraid. On both counts.

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 21 Jan 2007 02:30:34 GMT
--------
Reg wrote:
> Uh, no. It was others that suggested it might not taste very good.
> With good reason. I simply questioned whether it would actually
> work or not.

So go try it and come back to us with the results.

============================

From: Blair P. Houghton 
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2007 18:08:46 GMT
--------
Peter Lucas wrote:
>I don't do it all the time. My scrambled eggs are just fine.

Seriously.

Anyone who can't whip scrambled eggs enough to make them
fluffy just doesn't deserve them.

============================

From: aem 
Date: 21 Jan 2007 10:16:23 -0800
--------
Blair P. Houghton wrote:
> Anyone who can't whip scrambled eggs enough to make them
> fluffy just doesn't deserve them.

That's true of this whole strange thread.  Anyone who contemplates
needing baking powder for mashed potatoes needs more help than the
powder will provide.    -aem

============================

From: Dan S. 
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2007 18:31:09 GMT
--------
Blair P. Houghton wrote:
> Anyone who can't whip scrambled eggs enough to make them
> fluffy just doesn't deserve them.

The purpose of the BP is to, according to rumor, to remedy the transition 
from yellow to green when held hot for serving.  Not to fluff them.  I'm not 
sure that the BP would even react in such a manner as to create the CO2 
bubbles in scrambled eggs.

============================

From: Shadowdog 
Date: 21 Jan 2007 10:37:22 -0800
--------
Blair P. Houghton wrote:
> Anyone who can't whip scrambled eggs enough to make them
> fluffy just doesn't deserve them.

I cook my scrambled eggs in the microwave.  Stir them with a fork every
30 seconds and they puff right up nice and fluffy.

============================

From: Dan S. 
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2007 18:55:01 GMT
--------
Shadowdog wrote:
> I cook my scrambled eggs in the microwave.  Stir them with a fork every
> 30 seconds and they puff right up nice and fluffy.

College student, or first apartment?

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 22 Jan 2007 03:41:48 GMT
--------
Dan S. wrote:
> College student, or first apartment?

Not at all. I do the same. Haven't bothered cooking scrambled eggs on 
the stove for quite some time now. It's very convenient to do them in 
the microwave.

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 22 Jan 2007 03:40:20 GMT
--------
Blair P. Houghton wrote:
> Anyone who can't whip scrambled eggs enough to make them
> fluffy just doesn't deserve them.

I don't "whip" my scrambled eggs, I beat them.

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 05:22:06 GMT
--------
Peter Lucas wrote:
> I don't "whip" my scrambled eggs, I beat them.

I suspect it's just another term for the same process. Here, I like to chook 
the eggs with a ksihw, unless it's dirty and I'm in a rush, in which case I 
use a krof. 

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 22 Jan 2007 05:32:10 GMT
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> I suspect it's just another term for the same process. Here, I like to
> chook 

Shouldn't that be kooc?

>the eggs with a ksihw, unless it's dirty and I'm in a rush, in
> which case I use a krof. 

I only ever use a krof.

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 13:13:01 GMT
--------
Peter Lucas wrote:
>> I suspect it's just another term for the same process. Here, I like to
>> chook
>
> Shouldn't that be kooc?

No. I liked the word. :)

============================

From: Blair P. Houghton 
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2007 14:13:36 GMT
--------
Peter Lucas wrote:
>I don't "whip" my scrambled eggs, I beat them.

Beat is a vigorous mix.  Whip is incorporating air.

I found once I stopped thinking beat and started
thinking whip, my omelettes and scrambled eggs improved.
They aren't whipped to peaks or even close to that, but
they get an extra few seconds of extra-strenuous effort,
using a wisk instead of a fork, and I make sure I do it
right before they hit the pan so what foaming there is
remains trapped.

And then the trick is to cook them until soft and wet,
because if you cook them solid they'll be spongy.

No milk.  Good grief, no.

============================

From: me[at]privacy.net (TammyM)
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2007 14:21:48 GMT
--------
Blair P. Houghton wrote:

>Beat is a vigorous mix.  Whip is incorporating air.
>
>I found once I stopped thinking beat and started
>thinking whip, my omelettes and scrambled eggs improved.

Whipping makes all the difference, imo.  Think of all those French
cooks, using a copper bowl and a whisk, developing some serious arm
mus-kles!  I take the woosie way out, but my omelets and scrambled
eggs (ahem) can't be beat!

>And then the trick is to cook them until soft and wet,
>because if you cook them solid they'll be spongy.

Or dry and flat.  Blech.

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 23 Jan 2007 22:56:34 GMT
--------
Blair P. Houghton wrote:
> No milk.  Good grief, no.

Nope, no milk. Just 2 eggs, cream, cracked black pepper and some chopped 
Continental Parsley in a bowl.

Beat briskly with a fork and nuke in the m/wave for approx 1min 40secs. 
Stop halfway thru and stir.

They come out fluffy, and light.

============================

From: Blair P. Houghton 
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2007 05:54:15 GMT
--------
Peter Lucas wrote:
>Nope, no milk. Just 2 eggs, cream, cracked black pepper and some chopped 
>Continental Parsley in a bowl.

Okay, what part of cream isn't milk?

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 25 Jan 2007 14:51:01 GMT
--------
Blair P. Houghton wrote:
> Okay, what part of cream isn't milk?

The part that comes in a container that says "Cream", Blah.

============================

From: Blair P. Houghton 
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2007 04:32:53 GMT
--------
Peter Lucas wrote:
>The part that comes in a container that says "Cream", Blah.

I'll ask it again.  Reminding you of how "Cream" is made.

What part of cream isn't milk?

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2007 16:07:32 -0600
--------
Blair P. Houghton wrote:
>Okay, what part of cream isn't milk?

The part that isn't fat (which makes it cream) is milk.

============================

From: Blair P. Houghton 
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2007 04:40:52 GMT
--------
Alan wrote:
>The part that isn't fat (which makes it cream) is milk.

Cream is only 37% fat.

And the fat in cream is milk, too.

Calling it "cream" because it's been skimmed off the rest
doesn't make it not milk.

============================

From: Food Snob 
Date: 20 Jan 2007 18:40:36 -0800
--------
Reg wrote:
> I have and it's not a very good method.
>
> For lighter style eggs I prefer to separate the whites, whip
> them, and fold them back in with the yolks. It makes for a much
> better result than adding baking powder.

Better yet, add back only half of the whipped whites, tossing the rest
or reserving for merengues.  Much nicer.
Adding baking powder sounds horrible.

--Bryan

============================

From: Reg 
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2007 02:56:04 GMT
--------
Food Snob wrote:
> Better yet, add back only half of the whipped whites, tossing the rest
> or reserving for merengues.  Much nicer.

True. You can adjust the amount of puff by varying how
much you whip the whites and/or holding some back.

I don't do it any one way. Sometimes maximum puff,
sometime a little, sometimes none.

> Adding baking powder sounds horrible.

It is. Plus it doesn't make a whole lot of sense to add a
chemical leavener to scrambled eggs. Prepared the right way,
eggs are a leavener.

============================

From: Peter Aitken 
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2007 07:54:22 -0500
--------
Peter Lucas says...
> You can add Baking Powder to your scrambled eggs, and they make them 
> fluffier (and yes, I have done this), so what wouldn't make sense in 
> adding it to mashed potato?

If you know how to make them properly, scrambled eggs and mashed 
potatoes are just perfect without any BP. Better to learn how to cook 
than to rely of crutches like this.

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 19 Jan 2007 16:43:30 GMT
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
> If you know how to make them properly, scrambled eggs and mashed 
> potatoes are just perfect without any BP. Better to learn how to cook 
> than to rely of crutches like this.

Phaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaark!!! *Another* one!!!!

Why aren't you on TV, with your own show, if you're soooo frikken 
perfect???

============================

From: Peter A 
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2007 13:53:26 -0500
--------
Peter Lucas says...
> Phaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaark!!! *Another* one!!!!

Yep, another intelligent, educated, mature person. There are quite a few 
of us on this group.
 
> Why aren't you on TV, with your own show, if you're soooo frikken 
> perfect???
 
Are you 14 years old or what? Your comments regularly have all the wit 
and knowledge of a pre-pubescent teen, and your efforts to present 
yourself as clever and knowledgeable are just a hoot. Sheldon without 
the foul mouth.

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2007 01:50:11 +0100 (CET)
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:

> Yep, another intelligent, educated, mature person. There are quite a few 
> of us on this group.

You use the term "us" rather loosely.

> Are you 14 years old or what? Your comments regularly have all the wit 
> and knowledge of a pre-pubescent teen, and your efforts to present 
> yourself as clever and knowledgeable are just a hoot. Sheldon without 
> the foul mouth.

You didn't answer the question, I see. Nice swerve.

You've got your head up your ass attitude, the same as Reg.

Look back over the beginning of the thread...... it's main point was to 
find out *if* Baking Powder can indeed be added to mashed potato, and 
would it work.

It has been ascertained that it can, and it does.

Your input is no longer required.

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 19 Jan 2007 05:38:52 GMT
--------
Reg wrote:
> I never said I know it doesn't work. You, on the other
> hand, said you know it does though you haven't actually
> tried it.

You're a Texan, aren't you Reg?

============================

From: charles381[at]webtv.net
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2007 14:23:05 -0500
--------
..but the BP clings to the molecules and transfers its gas into them
and makes them puffier....thus a fluffy mashed potato.

chef charles

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2007 16:05:37 -0500
--------
charles381 wrote:
> ..but the BP clings to the molecules and transfers its gas into them
> and makes them puffier....thus a fluffy mashed potato.

So you've actually done this? I'd never heard of such a thing...and that 
also surprised me. JoC and Julia certainly never did it. My potatoes 
always seem to mash up nice without it.

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 22 Jan 2007 03:56:22 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> So you've actually done this? I'd never heard of such a thing...and that 
> also surprised me. JoC and Julia certainly never did it. My potatoes 
> always seem to mash up nice without it.

It *can* be done, as as such was printed as a *hint* on the bag of spuds 
the OP purchased.

============================

From: Lou Decruss 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 16:41:20 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
>So you've actually done this? I'd never heard of such a thing...and that 
>also surprised me. JoC and Julia certainly never did it. My potatoes 
>always seem to mash up nice without it.

Unless I missed a post it seems if charles has he's the only one here
who has tried it.  So I did.  But not for mashed potatoes.  I made
Duchess potatoes and also tried piping the mixture in the skins for
twice baked.  Both came out light and fluffy.  But they always do
prepared this way.  I tried it because several years ago I attended an
upscale wedding at a Hilton hotel.  The twice baked spuds were very
different from anything I've had or made.  I asked anyone from the
hotel who would talk to me what was in them, but got nowhere. I was
hoping baking powder was the answer.  I'll try it again and do a side
by side, but for now I'd have to say the results were unremarkable.

We were drinking Saturday night so my presentation isn't the best in
the following picture.  I goofed and had to make a second pass over
the skins, but they were good. (as usual)

http://i14.tinypic.com/2vi420i.jpg

============================

From: Dan S. 
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2007 04:28:26 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
>I picked up a nice bag of russet potatoes today while at Sam's. The brand 
>name was Del Monte. On the back were "tips" on various methods of use and 
>one of the tips was that while making mashed potatoes, adding a teaspoon of 
>baking powder makes them "fluffier". Huh?? I've never heard of such a 
>thing... has anyone else?

and, if you put a pinch of baking soda in your scrambled eggs, they will sit 
without turning green -- either that or baking powder -- someone try it and 
lemme know how it turns out.

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2007 12:43:16 GMT
--------
Dan S. wrote:
> and, if you put a pinch of baking soda in your scrambled eggs, they will 
> sit without turning green -- either that or baking powder -- someone try 
> it and lemme know how it turns out.

I've never seen scrambled eggs turn green. How long do you let yours sit, 
and why? 

============================

From: Dan S. 
Date: Sat, 20 Jan 2007 01:53:03 GMT
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> I've never seen scrambled eggs turn green. How long do you let yours sit, 
> and why?

If you make any quantity of scrambled eggs to serve to a quantity of people 
and serve them out of a serving dish, they normally will turn green if 
cooked hard.  They normally won't if you leave them a little soft.  Some 
people don't cotton to the sliminess associated with soft scrambled eggs, 
so, I've heard that baking soda will remedy this.  Certainly this won't 
happen if you eat them right away.  Look for it to occur especially on a 
steam table or in a chafing dish where the eggs continue to cook after 
served.

============================

From: LadyJane 
Date: 19 Jan 2007 20:21:37 -0800
--------
I honestly can't think of anything more foul than using a baking
product with eggs... or mashed potato...  unless you 'cook out' the
baking powder, or it will undoubtedly have a hint of the taste (at
best) of bp.

As far as mashed spuds go you have to put in the hard yards! Choose the
right spuds, boil them sufficiently to tender, then mash the crap out
of them to get the 'air' in them! The more mashing time the more air in
there.

My mashed spuds are awesome (even if I do say so myself). I usually
boil the spuds (desiree, or bog-standard spuds) together with 3-4
cloves garlic till tender. Drain well. Allow to dry off any remaining
liquid in pan on still warm element/burner for 30 seconds or so.
Smash those spuds (and garlic) well then add 1 or 2 whole eggs. Add one
egg at a time to reach desired consistency.
Season with salt & pepper - even add some sharp cheddar or (my
favourite) freshly grated/shaved parmesan.

The egg/s gives a creamy, fluffy texture to the mash, and brings a
wonderful colour (via the yolk). Healthier, IMHO, than loads of
butter/cream, but with similar textural results.
No need to add any butter, cream, milk..... the humble egg does it all
- and beautifully!

as for scrambled eggs - very lightly whisk eggs with a little freshly
ground black pepper and add to a hot buttered skillet. Allow to cook
for about 1 minute then (till it starts to rise like an omlette, then
use a plastic spatula and keep those eggs moving - no metal utensils or
the eggs will discolour. Cook to desired consistency....I like mine
very soft! Add salt once cooked... never during cooking or the eggs
with toughen. My 2 cents worth anyway.

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Sat, 20 Jan 2007 04:24:59 GMT
--------
LadyJane wrote:
> no metal utensils or
> the eggs will discolour.

This must depend on the quality and type of metal, because in 35 years of 
making eggs, I've never seen it happen. Unless you're cooking with a 
non-stick pan, the eggs are being cooked "in metal", often stainless steel. 
So, why should a stainless steel spatula affect the eggs when the pan does 
not? 

============================

From: LadyJane 
Date: 19 Jan 2007 20:40:39 -0800
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> This must depend on the quality and type of metal, because in 35 years of
> making eggs, I've never seen it happen. Unless you're cooking with a
> non-stick pan, the eggs are being cooked "in metal", often stainless steel.
> So, why should a stainless steel spatula affect the eggs when the pan does
> not?

Because as you say, the pan may well be metal (and not non-stick) and
the two metals react with the eggs.
SS may not - I don't use ss utensils so can't say.  Has always been
imprinted from cooking lessons - use plastic or wood when dealing with
cooking eggs.
I don't like, nor have any, non-stick pans. Enamel, yes, stainless
steel yes, ceramic yes. Non-stick, yuck. No way.
And you'd not use a metal implement with a non-stick pan in the first
place.

Remember many eons ago - must be 30 years at least - had major
dentisty... arrived home doped to the eyeballs (yep, utter coward and
opted for total anastheasia) woke 2 days later (anastheasiest had a
good may questions to answer) and all I felt like was scrambled eggs.
Husband made them in a lovely enamelled skillet... but used a metal
spoon during cooking/serving process... they tasted ok (hey, McDonald's
would probably have done so too after two days!)  but looked revolting.

============================

From: Kate Connally 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 15:56:04 -0500
--------
Dan S. wrote:

> If you make any quantity of scrambled eggs to serve to a quantity of people 
> and serve them out of a serving dish, they normally will turn green if 
> cooked hard.

Well, I've made hard-cooked scrambled eggs and had leftovers
from them the next day and they've never turned green.  Just
on ones I forgot about and left in the fridge for 6 months.

> Look for it to occur especially on a 
> steam table or in a chafing dish where the eggs continue to cook after 
> served.

I've never seen this at the many breakfast buffets I've
eaten at either.

============================

From: Dan S. 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 21:06:02 GMT
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
> I've never seen this at the many breakfast buffets I've
> eaten at either.

I'm quite certain not all physicists are astro-physicists either.  Thus, not 
everyone will have the experiences.  It's what happens.  Take it or leave 
it. 

============================

From: Mike H 
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2007 06:44:11 GMT
--------
Kate Connally wrote:

> Well, I've made hard-cooked scrambled eggs and had leftovers
> from them the next day and they've never turned green.  Just
> on ones I forgot about and left in the fridge for 6 months.

THat's not the same situation as is being refered to.   He's refering to 
hot holding for service, not storage.
 
> I've never seen this at the many breakfast buffets I've
> eaten at either.

I would hope not, a reputable buffet provider would swap out the eggs 
before it happened, or treats them as indicated.  I have seen it happen, it 
was allowed to happen actually. 

============================

From: Kate Connally 
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2007 11:37:54 -0500
--------
Dan S. wrote:
> and, if you put a pinch of baking soda in your scrambled eggs, they will sit 
> without turning green -- either that or baking powder -- someone try it and 
> lemme know how it turns out.

I've never seen scrambled eggs turn green.  What in the
world would make them do that?

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 19 Jan 2007 16:53:45 GMT
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
> I've never seen scrambled eggs turn green.  What in the
> world would make them do that?

Looking at the sweet poached eggs sitting on 9 seed bread on the table 
next to them????

============================

From: yetanotherBob 
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2007 12:22:07 -0500
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
> I've never seen scrambled eggs turn green.  What in the
> world would make them do that?

I'm guessing their Mom would read Dr. Seuss to them before the mean 
farmer came and took them away.

Hey, could've happened.

Bob

============================

From: Mike H 
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2007 06:44:50 GMT
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
> I've never seen scrambled eggs turn green.  What in the
> world would make them do that?

Sulfur

============================

From: Kate Connally 
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2007 11:36:47 -0500
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> I picked up a nice bag of russet potatoes today while at Sam's. The 
> brand name was Del Monte. On the back were "tips" on various methods of 
> use and one of the tips was that while making mashed potatoes, adding a 
> teaspoon of baking powder makes them "fluffier". Huh?? I've never heard 
> of such a thing... has anyone else?

No, and it sounds disgusting.  And why do they need to
be fluffy in the first place.  I like my mashed potatoes
to have some substance to them.  And baking soda can
have an unpleasant bitter taste to it.
Kate

============================

From: Peter Lucas 
Date: 19 Jan 2007 16:52:20 GMT
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
> No, and it sounds disgusting.  And why do they need to
> be fluffy in the first place.  I like my mashed potatoes
> to have some substance to them.  And baking soda can
> have an unpleasant bitter taste to it.
> Kate

Don't knock it till you've tried it.

============================

From: jenyfari 
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2007 07:27:41 +0000
--------
I have never heard of the baking powder in mashed potatoes but I will be
giving it a go. 

This is my first post to this forum but it looks like a great place.
Can't wait to have a good look around.

============================

Subject: Re: Baking Powder in Mashed Potatoes?? An experiment
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: James Silverton 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 18:04:26 -0500
--------
Hello, Peter Lucas! You wrote:
> Don't knock it till you've tried it.

I have read this discussion with interest and I decided to try 
an experiment. I followed my recipe for mashed potatoes au 
gratin. I nuked a potato for 4 minutes, removed the potato and 
mashed it with milk and farmer's cheese (cream cheese or real 
cheese also works). I added 1 tsp of baking powder, divided the 
result and placed it in the potato skins. I then baked one skin 
at 350 for 25 minutes and kept the other on a hot tray. The one 
in the oven did rise and become lighter and slightly browned, 
the retained one did not do much. Actually, neither tasted bad 
tho' the unbaked one had a somewhat glutinous texture and the 
baked one was lighter. This would probably be in accordance with 
the known chemistry of baking powder that requires heat to 
produce the carbon dioxide to raise the mixture.

============================

From: Reg 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 23:19:27 GMT
--------
James Silverton wrote:
> This would probably be in accordance with the known 
> chemistry of baking powder that requires heat to produce the carbon 
> dioxide to raise the mixture.

"Known chemistry"?

Modern baking powder is "double acting", in that it produces
C02 by two different mechanisms. The first is by contact with
water, the second is by application of heat.

So no, it doesn't require heat to release C02. Contact with
water is sufficient.

============================

From: James Silverton 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 18:28:13 -0500
--------
Hello, Reg! You wrote:
> "Known chemistry"?
>
> Modern baking powder is "double acting", in that it produces
> C02 by two different mechanisms. The first is by contact
> with water, the second is by application of heat.
>
> So no, it doesn't require heat to release C02. Contact with
> water is sufficient.

So explain my results :-)

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 23:45:35 GMT
--------
James Silverton wrote:
> So explain my results :-)

His comments do not contradict your results. Rather, your explanation 
doesn't explain your results. 

============================

From: James Silverton 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 18:56:09 -0500
--------
Try it yourself. Add a teaspoon of baking powder to a glass of 
water at room temperature. The tartaric acid will react with the 
sodium bicarbonate but the reaction is very slow and the bubbles 
come off very slowly.

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2007 00:47:40 GMT
--------
I'm not denying that it worked. I'm saying that your explanation as to why 
it worked is defective, compared to what Reg explained. It really doesn't 
matter, though. 

============================

From: Reg 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 23:57:21 GMT
--------
James Silverton wrote:
> So explain my results :-)

Sure. Your observations are about as reliable as your
knowledge of chemistry. Explains everything :)

Seriously, if you're really interested in meaningful
results you should try it again with three different
variations. One baked with BP, one baked without BP,
and one not baked. That would tell you if the BP
has any real effect. You could even leave out the
unbaked one at this point if you wanted.

Your experiment only shows that heating makes it
lighter. It doesn't show that BP causes it.

============================

From: James Silverton 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 19:02:26 -0500
--------
Hello, Reg! You wrote:
> Your experiment only shows that heating makes it
> lighter. It doesn't show that BP causes it.

Could be! However, an important point is the taste; I could not 
detect any difference. I do know what's supposed to be going on 
in baking powder as opposed to baking soda :-)


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