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Subject: great use for canned potatoes
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Sheryl Rosen 
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 04:16:59 GMT
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Someone asked, a few months ago I think, what canned potatoes are good for.

My mom used them a lot.  She made home fries with them on Sunday morning,
and she often used them for "roasted" potatoes.

I had forgotten how good they were that way.  But when I asked my sister
what to do with that pork roast, she said "remember the potatoes Mommy used
to make?" And I did, so I made those.

Simple, simple simple and SOO good!!!

I drained the potatoes well, added them to a hot cast iron skillet with some
butter melted in it.

Tossed the potatoes until coated with butter, let them brown a bit on top of
the stove, sprinkled with some seasoning (salt, pepper, paprika, which is
what Mom used, I used Old World cuz that's what I have) and put the entire
skillet in the oven next to the roast.

When they came out of the oven, they were incredibly golden brown and
crispy, but soft inside.

They were different than the roasted potatoes I make with raw
potatoes....different texture. I like them both, these are special... :-)

SOOO delicious!  

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From: Allan Suaza 
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 05:15:37 GMT
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Thanks, Sheryl, for this recipe. I have a couple of canned sliced potatoes,
and I wanted to do something along the lines of roasting them- And voila!
You probably have telepathic abilites, as your recipe sounds perfect. Also,
I love paprika on food, and for some inexplicable reason, it never occured
to me to use it on potatoes!

============================

From: terraXXX[at]att.net (Terra)
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 06:07:22 GMT
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Using only crude tools and determination, Sheryl Rosen wrote:
>Someone asked, a few months ago I think, what canned potatoes are good for.

I've never used canned potatoes; I don't think I've 
ever even noticed them in the canned veggie aisle. But
these sound wonderful, I'm going to have to try them.

Thanks for the recipe...

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From: Cyndi 
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 00:01:42 GMT
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Terra wrote:
: Thanks for the recipe...

Yep.  They're great that way!!

They're also good when you heat them up on the stove top and stir
in some butter, sour cream, black pepper, Lemon pepper and some
Butt Rub* (Meat seasoning, optional).

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 07:56:10 -0500
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Sheryl Rosen wrote:
> They were different than the roasted potatoes I make with raw
> potatoes....different texture. I like them both, these are special... :-)

Sounds great, I haven't had them in ages.  I make them on the
stove the way you did, add garlic and rosemary with the potatoes
and stir them occasionally to brown.  Of course my recipe calls
for scooping out potato balls using a melon baller and cooking
them first.  Canned potatoes skip those steps.

============================

From: Sheryl Rosen 
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 01:35:27 GMT
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Nancy Young wrote:
> Sounds great, I haven't had them in ages.  I make them on the
> stove the way you did, add garlic and rosemary with the potatoes
> and stir them occasionally to brown.  Of course my recipe calls
> for scooping out potato balls using a melon baller and cooking
> them first.  Canned potatoes skip those steps.

Know what? There's probably no reason you couldn't peel little red potatoes
and, say, microwave them for a few minutes, then treat them to the hot
butter in the skillet and into the oven routine.

But when canned potatoes are that cheap, why go through all that work?

============================

From: Isaac Wingfield 
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 06:20:56 GMT
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Sheryl Rosen wrote:
> Know what? There's probably no reason you couldn't peel little red potatoes
> and, say, microwave them for a few minutes, then treat them to the hot
> butter in the skillet and into the oven routine.

Microwaving potatoes makes them taste "not right" to me. Slice 'em in 
half (cut them to make the flat side as big as possible), and steam 
until tender (steaming is great, as it keeps them from getting "soggy"). 
Place, cut side down, in a skillet with some (however much your 
conscience will allow) butter. Sizzle until good and brown and crispy. 
Serve imediately.

============================

From: candeh[at]thelast.mile
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 06:59:44 GMT
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Sheryl Rosen wrote:
>But when canned potatoes are that cheap, why go through all that work?

I used to buy canned potatoes, and I would just nuke'em, add butter
and salt, and mash. Somewhere along the line, I lost my desire to buy
them anymore. I think maybe it might have something to do with them
being immersed in the liquid in the can for so long. But after reading
some of the ideas for preparing them, here in this thread, I might buy
some and try a different way of preparing them. But here lately, it
seems like a lot of grocery stores have bags of potatoes for "buy one
get one free" deals. At Winn-Dixie, over the last month I have bought
6 bags of potatoes, and both times they were "buy one get TWO free."
I imagine that in the summer months ahead, they won't be having these
specials. Then I'll get the canned.

============================

From: ElaineFromDrake[at]webtv.net (Elaine Goldberg)
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 06:35:09 -0700 (MST)
--------
Sheryl wrote:
> They were different than the roasted
> potatoes I make with raw
> potatoes....different texture. I like them
> both, these are special... :-)

>SOOO delicious!

It sounds good!  Did you use small whole potatoes or sliced?

============================

From: Sheryl Rosen 
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 01:33:19 GMT
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Elaine Goldberg wrote:
> It sounds good!  Did you use small whole potatoes or sliced?

Whole.
And I buy unsalted, and add my own. They could have used a bit more salt, a
nice little sprinkle of kosher salt, once they were out of the oven, would
have added something. But they were awfully good.

============================

From: ElaineFromDrake[at]webtv.net (Elaine Goldberg)
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 21:32:52 -0700 (MST)
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Sheryl wrote:
>Whole. 
>And I buy unsalted, and add my own. They could have used a bit more salt, a
>nice little sprinkle of kosher salt, once they were out of the oven, would
>have added something. But they were awfully good.

I'm going to try it.  It seems I am either too tired to bother cooking
anything good after work, or I go on a cooking binge during the week
end, but end up hating the leftovers before they are gone.  This will be
a good change of pace for me.  

I made bath salts for party favours recently, and have lots of kosher
salt left from that project.  

============================

From: candeh[at]thelast.mile
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 07:07:33 GMT
--------
Elaine Goldberg wrote:
>I'm going to try it.  It seems I am either too tired to bother cooking
>anything good after work, or I go on a cooking binge during the week
>end, but end up hating the leftovers before they are gone.  This will be
>a good change of pace for me.  

Make a beef stew or lasagna on the weekend. Or both, if you tend to
"binge cook" on the weekends. Both of these dishes get better after a
day or three, and they are "one dish" meals, suitable for serving all
on their own, or taking to work to heat up in the microwave. After you
get in the habit of taking your own home cooked meals to work, nothing
else compares. Remember to pack a spoon!

============================

From: ElaineFromDrake[at]webtv.net (Elaine Goldberg)
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 05:36:10 -0700 (MST)
--------
Candeh wrote:

> Make a beef stew or lasagna on the
> weekend. Or both, if you tend to "binge
> cook" on the weekends. Both of these
> dishes get better after a day or three,
> and they are "one dish" meals, suitable
> for serving all on their own, or taking to
> work to heat up in the microwave. 

Good suggestions.  I've only made lasagne 2 or 3 times in my life.  I
used different recipes each time, and was always disappointed, no matter
how elaborate the recipe, or costly the ingredients.  I think there's a
lasagne thread on this newsgroup at the moment.  I'd not read it, but
will check it out.

>After you get in the habit of taking your
> own home cooked meals to work,
> nothing else compares. Remember to
> pack a spoon!

The truth is that I seldom eat lunch on a workday because, more often
than not, I've ended up with a stomach ache afterwards, and it's just
not been worth it.   I feel best when I'm able to eat slowly, and feel
relaxed.  (I'll remember the spoon, however, if I try taking something
like this to work)!

============================

From: Judy G 
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 09:32:46 -0500
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Sheryl Rosen wrote:
> Someone asked, a few months ago I think, what canned potatoes are good for.

As a 51 year old long time cook it embarrasses me to admit that my DAUGHTER
told me about canned potatoes.  Somewhere in my past I must have come across
something I thought tasted like what a canned potato must taste like, and
decided then and there to never try em.

I tried em and I agree, in the proper place, they are excellent!

============================

From: rosie readandpost 
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 09:00:49 -0600
--------
during the last 30 minutes of roasting, any meat, i can throw in a can of
(drained) whole potatoes.

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From: bob in schenectady 
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 15:14:09 GMT
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I remember using them as a BOY SCOUT (some 40 +- years ago) on camping trips
for home fries for breakfast.  Butter & parsley, a little paprika. . .
mmmmmm...

Just picked a couple of cans last week at the "Price Right" Grocery store
for 29 cents a can!!

============================

From: stan[at]temple.edu
Date: 10 Feb 2003 15:22:56 GMT
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bob in schenectady wrote:
> I remember using them as a BOY SCOUT (some 40 +- years ago) on camping trips
> for home fries for breakfast.  Butter & parsley, a little paprika. . .
> mmmmmm...

One of my favorite ways to prepare potatoes is to drain a can of whole
potatoes, then pat the spuds dry with a paper towel, cut them in half and
fry them like home fries.

> Just picked a couple of cans last week at the "Price Right" Grocery store
> for 29 cents a can!!

I prefer Delmonte's canned potatoes. The other
canned potato brands seem to disintegrate while they're still in the can
or shortly after I start to cook them.

============================

From: Sheryl Rosen 
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 01:30:52 GMT
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bob in schenectady wrote:
> Just picked a couple of cans last week at the "Price Right" Grocery store
> for 29 cents a can!!

Bob,
Is that Price RIGHT or Price RITE? (Not being pedantic, just wondering if
it's the same store)

I recently discovered Price Rite near me. it's a bit off my beaten path, I
have to make a special trip there, but the prices are great.  Produce is
very inexpensive. I get bananas there 3 lbs for $1. They are more than
double that in my regular market.  Apples, 99 cents a pound, vs. $1.49,
1.69.  Cabbage, 25 cents a pound, vs. 69 cents a pound.  Cauliflower...99
cents a large head, vs. 2.99!!!  And lots of other bargains.  I use special
milk, it's over a dollar cheaper there than the market!  Paper goods, bags,
foil, etc are much less expensive, too.   They carry my (bargain) brand of
laundry detergent and my brand of (bargain) fabric softener for $1.99, vs.
twice that at the supermarket. I use Nice and Fluffy, btw, for both. They
smell good and don't make me itch. And they don't break the bank.  I spent
$20 for a carriage full of stuff.....woulda easily cost me $40 at the
market. 

And the best part is,  NO CARD!!!!! Anyone can wander in off the street with
money and get low prices.

I had to take a huge pay cut in this horrible economy (not that I'm
complaining, I realize how lucky I am to have a job, any job, let alone in
my field).  I don't have a helluva lot of time, but it makes more sense for
me to stretch my pennies on food and  household products by shopping around.
And I try to go to these places that are a little far flung while I'm doing
other things (visiting friends, for example).  Also, since none of my
friends are adverse to saving some money, we go together!  So it's more than
just shopping drudgery, it's social, too.

I do spend a lot more time planning my purchases and shopping for them, but
I'm getting a lot more for my money, too.

============================

From: bob in schenectady 
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 23:18:39 GMT
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Sheryl Rosen wrote:
> Is that Price RIGHT or Price RITE? (Not being pedantic, just wondering if
> it's the same store)

PRICE RITE, I think.

Another good buy there is BUTTER (salted or unsalted)  $1.49 / lb.

I figure butter is butter, ya know??

I also picked up on the CHICKEN LEG QUARTERS 10 lb. bag for $3.90.
Incredible!

Pretty neat. . .

Bob (somewhere near) Schenectady

============================

From: Sheryl Rosen 
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 2003 00:12:34 GMT
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bob in schenectady wrote:

> I figure butter is butter, ya know??

It's 1.69 here, but I bought some of that too my last time there. Butter at
Stop and Shop is $2.99-3.49, depending on brand.

> I also picked up on the CHICKEN LEG QUARTERS 10 lb. bag for $3.90.

Everyone around me was buying those up like MAD!!! People in front of me had
FIVE bags! Next to me, two. Behind me, two.  A few aisles over, more people
had multiple bags.  I didn't know the price, just noticed they were leg
quarters and decided I wasn't interested, no matter what the price.
Although......they would be fine for soup! And I could always dice up the
meat for chicken salad. Hmm....maybe I'll get one bag next time. When I
start using up the stuff that's already in my freezer.

> Incredible!

I love that store! I love saving so much money.

============================

From: TonyaE3[at]webtv.net (TonyaE3)
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 21:00:55 -0500 (EST)
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Sheryl Rosen wrote:
> Someone asked, a few months ago I think, what canned potatoes are good for. 

When I worked @ Laughner's -Indiana- we deep fried those canned potatoes
till golden brown  drained  sprinkled with paprika 
It was their top side dish N the hardest to keep up with  

============================

From: bluebowling[at]yahoo.ca
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 23:05:36 -0500
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Sheryl Rosen wrote:
>Someone asked, a few months ago I think, what canned potatoes are good for.

I will definitely be trying some of these ways of using canned
potatoes -- but I have to ask -- is there any food value in them?
Beans keep there value canned, vegetables to some degree, but what
about potatoes?

============================

From: Sheryl Rosen 
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 2003 03:53:24 GMT
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bluebowling wrote:
> I will definitely be trying some of these ways of using canned
> potatoes -- but I have to ask -- is there any food value in them?
> Beans keep there value canned, vegetables to some degree, but what
> about potatoes?

Aside from potassium and starch, what food value do potatoes have?

Much of the time, vegetables and fruits that are canned or frozen retain
most of their nutrition because they are processed very soon after
harvesting.  With "fresh" produce, you don't know how long ago they were
harvested, and once they are picked, it's all downhill from there!  You've
probably got a better shot at getting more nutrition from canned or frozen
than from "fresh", unless you've picked it yourself or bought it at a farm
stand where you know it was harvested earlier that same day.

============================

From: pattee[at]spot.colorado.edu (Donna Pattee)
Date: 12 Feb 2003 17:34:51 GMT
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Sheryl Rosen wrote:
>Aside from potassium and starch, what food value do potatoes have?

Vitamin C (probably none left in canned though) and fiber.

> With "fresh" produce, you don't know how long ago they were
>harvested, and once they are picked, it's all downhill from there!  You've
>probably got a better shot at getting more nutrition from canned or frozen
>than from "fresh", unless you've picked it yourself or bought it at a farm
>stand where you know it was harvested earlier that same day.

The more volatile vitamins may be lower in the "fresh" produce, but I would 
guess that Vitamin A and K don't deteriorate too rapidly. 

============================

From: Pat Meadows 
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 2003 20:32:23 GMT
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Donna Pattee wrote:
>>Aside from potassium and starch, what food value do potatoes have?
>
>Vitamin C (probably none left in canned though) and fiber.

And calories which we tend to forget are necessary because
we generally have too many of them.  But calories are
extremely valuable to those who don't have enough food.

============================

Subject: Canned potatoes-was: Re: Pork Loin, Mmm Mmm Good!
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Rodney Myrvaagnes 
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 2003 00:42:07 -0500
--------
I have seen several mentions of canned potatoes in this thread. I am
67 years old and cannot recall ever seeing one. Can anyone enlighten
me: What?, Why?, etc.

Just idle curiosity, so don't go to any trouble.

============================

From: jammer 
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 2003 01:11:05 -0600
--------
Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:
>I have seen several mentions of canned potatoes in this thread. I am
>67 years old and cannot recall ever seeing one. Can anyone enlighten
>me: What?, Why?, etc.

Hi Rodney,

It might be like me. I have never studied the vegetable isle and would
grab that corn, peas, whatever and leave. We had some funky potatoes
at a friend's house and she said they were canned. Next time at the
store i looked and there they were and had apparently always been
there. 

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 2003 09:02:22 -0500
--------
Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:
> I have seen several mentions of canned potatoes in this thread. I am
> 67 years old and cannot recall ever seeing one. Can anyone enlighten
> me: What?, Why?, etc.

They're there, you just never noticed them.  I will warn you right
now, and I'm surprised no one has said it already, lots of people
can't stand them.  I happen to be one of those people who like
them.  I just never think to buy them.

Why canned potatoes, I don't know.  They are peeled and are smallish
balls, not big like your average potato.  They have a different
texture.  

============================

From: Tom Royer 
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 2003 09:17:57 -0500
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Why canned potatoes, I don't know.  They are peeled and are smallish
> balls, not big like your average potato.  They have a different
> texture.

Once you drain them and rinse off the obnoxious brine that they're
packed in, they can be treated as "boiled" potatoes.  Sliced or chopped,
they can be the start of some really good home fries.  Placed in a
400 degree oven for 10 to 20 minutes (be flexible) they make OK
roasted potatoes. Warmed with some butter or oil, they can be
used as a boiled potato side dish.

They make terrible mashed potatoes.

============================

From: Sheryl  Rosen 
Date: Thu, 13 Feb 2003 02:27:57 GMT
--------
Tom Royer wrote:
> Once you drain them and rinse off the obnoxious brine that they're
> packed in, they can be treated as "boiled" potatoes.

To avoid that obnoxious brine, just buy them unsalted and sprinkle them with
some kosher salt.  The unsalted ones are actually decent.

Make them like I did...sprinkled with salt and pepper, then tossed in a hot
cast iron skillet with melted butter. I started frying them on top of the
stove, they started to get brown, tossed them to coat all over with melted
butter, and roasted at 350 for about half an hour, maybe.  They got to be
crispy and dark brown. Really delicious.

============================

From: jarvis57[at]ix.netcom.com (Tara)
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 2003 23:23:42 GMT
--------
Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:
>I have seen several mentions of canned potatoes in this thread. I am
>67 years old and cannot recall ever seeing one. Can anyone enlighten
>me: What?, Why?, etc.

Why?  Because my fresh potatoes have gone all stinky and I'm in no
mood to go the grocery store but I still want some browned potatoes.
It's a nice thing to have on hand.

============================

From: Rodney Myrvaagnes 
Date: Thu, 13 Feb 2003 12:52:33 -0500
--------
Thanks to all who answered.


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