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Subject: greasing outside of baked potato?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Janet Bostwick 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 09:14:43 -0700
--------
I don't understand this greasing the outside of the baked potato thing--no
one I know does it.  I'm wondering if it is a regional thing.  I started out
in the mid-west and am now in the west.  Where are you folks that grease the
outside of a potato before baking it?

============================

From: bob in schenectady 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 16:20:18 GMT
--------
I rub a bit of olive oil on my washed & DRIED baking potatos, then sprinkle
on salt & pepper before baking.  The oil does two things:  1) helps the
potato skin crisp up and 2) helps hold the salt & pepper on.
Both of these are important if you eat the skin (Yum!!)

============================

From: Scott 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 02:39:24 GMT
--------
bob in schenectady wrote:
> I rub a bit of olive oil on my washed & DRIED baking potatos, then sprinkle
> on salt & pepper before baking.  The oil does two things:  1) helps the
> potato skin crisp up and 2) 

How does a little oil crisp the skin?

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 02:05:28 -0600
--------
Scott wrote:
> How does a little oil crisp the skin?

What an absurd question!  Ever heard of crispy fried chicken?  How about
bacon?  The fat from the bacon crisps it as it cooks.  Oil = fat =crisp.

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 12:48:21 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> What an absurd question!  Ever heard of crispy fried chicken?  How about
> bacon?  The fat from the bacon crisps it as it cooks.  Oil = fat =crisp.

Why is it absurd?  Because you know the answer and the OP did not?  I find
it no more absurd and someone recently asking how to dispose of used cooking
oil.  Like they never heard of jars and bottles!

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 10:09:21 -0600
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> Why is it absurd?  Because you know the answer and the OP did not?  I
> find it no more absurd and someone recently asking how to dispose of
> used cooking oil.  Like they never heard of jars and bottles!
> Ed

Okay, I apologize.  But still, oil or butter does obviously crisp things in
the oven.

As for disposing of grease, before washing a pan that contains (for example)
bacon fat, rub it with a few slices of bread.  Then toss it out for the
birds.  They love it, and their metabolism is such that they require fat in
large amounts.  Takes a lot of energy to fly.  Ever see an obese bird? 

============================

From: Kendall F. Stratton III 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 11:18:50 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> As for disposing of grease, before washing a pan that contains (for example)
> bacon fat, rub it with a few slices of bread.  Then toss it out for the
> birds.  They love it, and their metabolism is such that they require fat in
> large amounts.  Takes a lot of energy to fly.  Ever see an obese bird? 

Great advice, Jill... for getting rid of small amounts of fat!   I toss a
lot of old bread out in the backyard during the winter, but never thought of
using it to soak up the grease!

Thanks for the tip!

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 12:00:48 -0600
--------
K3 wrote:
> Great advice, Jill... for getting rid of small amounts of fat!   I
> toss a lot of old bread out in the backyard during the winter, but
> never thought of using it to soak up the grease!

You're welcome!  (sigh) It takes so little to make birds happy.  Maybe
that's why I love them so much.

============================

From: Janet Bostwick 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 10:11:36 -0700
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Okay, I apologize.  But still, oil or butter does obviously crisp things in
> the oven.

That was one of the reasons why I asked the question originally.  I've been
exposed to greased baked potato skins only in roadside and similar eateries
in the south while traveling.  The skin has never been crisp, only soft and
unpleasantly greasy.  I had speculated that the potatoes were baked in large
quantities and greased for expedience to keep them from drying out in the
warming drawer.

From observation of those particular baked potatoes, it seemed to me that
the greasing altered the texture and fluffiness of the interior.  It could
be that different potatoes were used than I am accustomed to.  When I bake a
potato, cut a slit in the top and pinch the potato, the contents burst
upwards in a sort of fluffy, white and starchy/mealy good stuff.  The
greased potatoes seemed to be more steamed and had a more grayish,
translucent appearance.  That's why I couldn't imagine that anyone would
want to bake a potato that way on purpose.

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 11:52:58 -0600
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote:
>   The greased potatoes seemed to be more
> steamed and had a more grayish, translucent appearance.  That's why I
> couldn't imagine that anyone would want to bake a potato that way on
> purpose.

Janet,

Oh no, not at all grayish, translucent nor un-fluffy (is that a word?)
Honestly, rub them with butter and sprinkle with salt.  Bake at about 450F
for an hour.  They come out crispy outside, fluffy inside.  Like you said,
you poof them with your fingers and they just sort of fluff up.

Mom always made her potatoes this way.  When I was in my early twenties,
working in restaurants, they would oil the potatoes but then wrap them in
foil before baking.  I suppose this helped them hold for longer periods of
time, but they weren't really nice baked potatoes.

============================

From: Janet Bostwick 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 11:32:43 -0700
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Oh no, not at all grayish, translucent nor un-fluffy (is that a word?)
> Honestly, rub them with butter and sprinkle with salt.  Bake at about 450F
> for an hour.  They come out crispy outside, fluffy inside.  Like you said,
> you poof them with your fingers and they just sort of fluff up.

At 450F for an hour the potato will get a nice crispy, nutty tasting skin
without the grease.  So, I guess it is a matter of taste and family
tradition.

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 12:51:21 -0600
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote:
> At 450F for an hour the potato will get a nice crispy, nutty tasting
> skin without the grease.  So, I guess it is a matter of taste and
> family tradition.

True, but if you like to eat the skins like I do, it's essential they be
buttered and then salted.  I've never cared for just oil on potato skins; it
serves the same purpose, I suppose, but doesn't taste nearly as good.

I had half a baked potato for breakfast.  The skin was buttered and salted
and I added cheese and bacon to the centre.

============================

From: zxcvbob 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 13:02:09 -0600
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> True, but if you like to eat the skins like I do, it's essential they be
> buttered and then salted.  I've never cared for just oil on potato skins; it
> serves the same purpose, I suppose, but doesn't taste nearly as good.

Try using bacon grease on the potato skins sometime.

-- Bob

============================

From: Scott 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 19:29:09 GMT
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote:
> That was one of the reasons why I asked the question originally.  I've been
> exposed to greased baked potato skins only in roadside and similar eateries
> in the south while traveling.  The skin has never been crisp, only soft and
> unpleasantly greasy.  I had speculated that the potatoes were baked in large
> quantities and greased for expedience to keep them from drying out in the
> warming drawer.

This was my thought.
Look at french fries made in oil that is too cool: they get soggy, and 
the outside is not crisp. 
I wonder if the baked potatoes' skins are getting crisp *despite* the 
oil; see

"How to Get Softer Skin on a Baked Potato
Lightly rub potato with oil or softened butter before baking."

For some very interesting information on how frying works, read Russ 
Parsons' "How to Read a French Fry." Frying something in hot oil is 
nothing at all like putting an oil covered object into a hot oven.

============================

From: Janet Bostwick 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 13:14:39 -0700
--------
Scott wrote:
> 
> "How to Get Softer Skin on a Baked Potato
> Lightly rub potato with oil or softened butter before baking."

That is what I had thought--that the grease would soften the skin.

============================

From: bob in schenectady 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 20:48:45 GMT
--------
Scott wrote:
> 
> "How to Get Softer Skin on a Baked Potato
> Lightly rub potato with oil or softened butter before baking."

Well, the potato does NOT get soggy when prepped with oil/grease prior to
baking.

The skins get delightfully crisp and tasty, espescially when dusted with
salt & pepper before baking.  In fact, replace the salt & pepper with
Montreal Steak Seasoning, like I do sometimes. It's great!

If you still think that oiling/greasing/(ok, buttering, Jill! :)) makes them
soggy, think potato chip.

Before "Potato Skins" became a menu item (about 25-30 years or so ago), we
used to take regular skins off (un-oiled) baked potatos at the end of
dinner, hit them with butter, salt & pepper & put them under the broiler for
a late-in-the dinner treat.

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 07:17:30 -0500
--------
bob in schenectady wrote:

> Well, the potato does NOT get soggy when prepped with oil/grease prior to
> baking.

I have never heard or experienced that, either.  If nothing else, I
don't see raw potato soaking great through the skin, or even the fork
marks.  Also, how much oil are we talking about, I can coat two good
sized potatoes with maybe a teaspoon of oil, with plenty left over to
wash off my hands.
 
> The skins get delightfully crisp and tasty, espescially when dusted with
> salt & pepper before baking.  In fact, replace the salt & pepper with
> Montreal Steak Seasoning, like I do sometimes. It's great!

That's a good idea.

> If you still think that oiling/greasing/(ok, buttering, Jill! :)) makes them
> soggy, think potato chip.
> 
> Before "Potato Skins" became a menu item (about 25-30 years or so ago), we
> used to take regular skins off (un-oiled) baked potatos at the end of
> dinner, hit them with butter, salt & pepper & put them under the broiler for
> a late-in-the dinner treat.

So you don't do that anymore?  (smile)  Sounds good to me.  When they
first started popping up on menus, I would be so embarrassed on a 
date to order them, they were my guilty secret.  Now I'm out and proud,
I eat the potato skins! 

============================

From: Tim 
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 13:34:33 +0100
--------
> ....snip...Now I'm out and proud,
> I eat the potato skins!

They're the best bits!

============================

From: Scott 
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 14:01:04 GMT
--------
bob in schenectady wrote:
> If you still think that oiling/greasing/(ok, buttering, Jill! :)) makes them
> soggy, think potato chip

ARGHH!! I address that already: frying produces different results than 
baking. Potato chips are fried, not baked, so they are crispy. This is 
why they can deep-fry Twinkies and have them come out with crispy 
coatings; if you coated a Twinky in oil then baked it, you'd have an 
oily Twinky.

============================

From: Tim 
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 15:19:34 +0100
--------
Scott wrote:
> ARGHH!! I address that already: frying produces different results than
> baking. Potato chips are fried, not baked, so they are crispy. This is
> why they can deep-fry Twinkies and have them come out with crispy
> coatings; if you coated a Twinky in oil then baked it, you'd have an
> oily Twinky.

If you coat a chicken in oil and then bake it you sometimes get a crispy
chicken.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 24 Mar 2003 16:45:55 GMT
--------
Tim writes:
>If you coat a chicken in oil and then bake it you sometimes get a crispy
>chicken.

If you get a crispy chicken you roasted it far too long... go instead for a
crispy chicken *skin*. duh.  

Potato chips crisp throughout because they are *thin*... and remain crisp
because they lack internal water/moisture throughout; potato chips are
essentially fully dehydrated... leave them exposed on a humid day and see just
how crisp they remain.  Baked potato skins will crisp just as well whether
oiled or not but one will be an oily crisp and one a dry crisp (exactly like
dry-roast peanuts).  Which one is best is primarily a matter of personal
preference.  I prefer my baked potatoes unoiled.... I suppose a preference
developed from enjoying many mickies (newsprint adds no oil and absorbs
moisture - I gotta try an oven roasted mickie - newsprint acts as a dessicant
and may even improve nucked spuds, iffn it doesn't burst into flame).  But
regardless, either style will lose its crispness rather rapidly as internal
water does it's thing (rehydration). 

============================

From: bob in schenectady 
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 14:29:24 GMT
--------
Scott wrote:
> ARGHH!! I address that already: frying produces different results than
> baking. Potato chips are fried, not baked, so they are crispy. This is
> why they can deep-fry Twinkies and have them come out with crispy
> coatings; if you coated a Twinky in oil then baked it, you'd have an
> oily Twinky.

This can only get so stupid.  You wanna argue with me whether or not my
baked potatos crisp up or not?  Fine.  You wanna find out for real?
THEN BAKE A POTATO AND TRY IT, SCOTTO.  Spend the dime fer crissake. Just
maybe we're all lying in an RFC conspiracy designed to sell more
oil/grease/butter.  And it's up to YOU to prove us all wrong.

A Twinkie.  Shee-it.  I KNOW who the twinkie is.

============================

From: Scott 
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 03:00:50 GMT
--------
bob in schenectady wrote:
> This can only get so stupid.  You wanna argue with me whether or not my
> baked potatos crisp up or not?  Fine.  You wanna find out for real?
> THEN BAKE A POTATO AND TRY IT, SCOTTO.  Spend the dime fer crissake. Just
> maybe we're all lying in an RFC conspiracy designed to sell more
> oil/grease/butter.  And it's up to YOU to prove us all wrong.

I have baked potatoes, but the point is that the I posted a link to the 
*United States Potato Board* (potatohelp.com) in which they stated that 
you rub a potato with oil before baking in order to get a softer skin. 
Do you think that maybe, just maybe, they have some experience with the 
subject??? The evidence is that the potato skins may crisp DESPITE the 
oil, not because of it.

============================

From: bob in schenectady 
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 13:35:47 GMT
--------
Scott wrote:
> I have baked potatoes, but the point is that the I posted a link to the
> *United States Potato Board* (potatohelp.com) in which they stated that
> you rub a potato with oil before baking in order to get a softer skin.
> Do you think that maybe, just maybe, they have some experience with the
> subject??? The evidence is that the potato skins may crisp DESPITE the
> oil, not because of it.

Sorry, I missed the link in your original post, and will take your word for
it.
I think we're both right - without oil/butter, the skins at times tend to
dry out and even flake off in layers.  However WITH some type of oil/butter
(I only use a THIN layer), they tend to weather the hour-or-so baking time
in one piece, and coupled with the added spices (to me anyway), taste
better.
To each his own.

Now let me tell you how to improve mashed potatoes with chive cream cheese.
. . . .

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 11:08:43 -0500
--------
Scott wrote:
> ARGHH!! I address that already: frying produces different results than
> baking. Potato chips are fried, not baked, so they are crispy. This is
> why they can deep-fry Twinkies and have them come out with crispy
> coatings; if you coated a Twinky in oil then baked it, you'd have an
> oily Twinky.

But a Twinky would sop up oil like nobody's business, not so a raw
potato!

============================

From: Scott 
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2003 14:16:23 GMT
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> But a Twinky would sop up oil like nobody's business, not so a raw
> potato!

My point was just to make a clearer, but still on point, example. The 
Twinkie does NOT soak up the oil when deep fried with oil that's at the 
proper temperature, just like batter coated fried chicken will be greasy 
or not, depending upon whether the oil's hot enough.

============================

From: connieg999[at]aol.com (ConnieG999)
Date: 24 Mar 2003 00:32:29 GMT
--------
Janet Bostwick writes:
>When I bake a
>potato, cut a slit in the top and pinch the potato, the contents burst
>upwards in a sort of fluffy, white and starchy/mealy good stuff.  The
>greased potatoes seemed to be more steamed and had a more grayish,
>translucent appearance. 

A lot of that difference has to do with the variety of potato used. Some will
produce that "fluffy" effect, and some never will. (G)

============================

From: Scott 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 13:57:45 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> What an absurd question!  Ever heard of crispy fried chicken?  How about
> bacon?  The fat from the bacon crisps it as it cooks.  Oil = fat =crisp.

It is your answer that is absurd; apparently, you do not understand that 
frying is different than baking. Dabbing oil on a potato and sticking it 
in an oven is baking, not frying, and has no parallel to frying chicken.
============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 10:52:54 -0600
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote:
> I don't understand this greasing the outside of the baked potato
> thing--no one I know does it.  I'm wondering if it is a regional
> thing.  I started out in the mid-west and am now in the west.  Where
> are you folks that grease the outside of a potato before baking it?
> Janet

I'm in Tennessee, but my mom does this and she's from Ohio.  We rub the
skins with butter and then sprinkle with salt.  It makes for a nice crispy
skin outside.  I don't know about you, but if the potato is done this way I
eat the whole thing, skin and all.

============================

From: hahabogus 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 18:35:26 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> I'm in Tennessee, but my mom does this and she's from Ohio.  We rub
> the skins with butter and then sprinkle with salt.  It makes for a
> nice crispy skin outside.  I don't know about you, but if the potato
> is done this way I eat the whole thing, skin and all.

The greasing of the skin has a lot related to whether or not you eat the 
skin. The grease helps make the skin crispier and good eating when also 
seasoned. Some folk like to wrap their baked spuds up in foil. To me that 
is almost criminal as it makes the skin less tasty and makes the insides 
more steamed than baked. I believe that the restaurant habit of serving 
foil wrapped baked spuds is the reason some do the same at home. The 
restaurant do that so the spuds can  stay warming all night and still taste 
reasonable whether it was cooked at noon and you're eating at 8 , or you 
get it at 3pm.

To me the best cooked spud is either a hot fresh out of the oven spud with 
a nice crisp skin and wonderfully fluffy interior or a ice cold baked spud 
2 or 3 day old served in buttered slices and S&P as a snack/quick meal.

I live in Canada.

============================

From: aintlifegrand[at]yup.com
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 00:55:40 GMT
--------
hahabogus wrote:
>The greasing of the skin has a lot related to whether or not you eat the 
>skin. The grease helps make the skin crispier and good eating when also 
>seasoned. 

I disagree. I've spent my whole life on the east coast of the US.  I had
never heard of greasing the skin of a baked potato before I read it in
this thread yesterday. I always eat the baked potato skin. It's the best
part.

ttfn,
jan

============================

From: Felice Friese 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 20:23:12 GMT
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote:
> I don't understand this greasing the outside of the baked potato
> thing--no one I know does it.  I'm wondering if it is a regional
> thing.  I started out in the mid-west and am now in the west.  Where
> are you folks that grease the outside of a potato before baking it?

One-word answer. Well, two. Cape Cod.

============================

From: Kristin Patterson 
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 05:53:46 GMT
--------
This is our "family recipe" called bowl taters.  After the potato is 
baked (no oil rubbed on!) you rub the outside with butter and sprinkle 
liberally with parmesean cheese and garlic salt.  Return to oven for 
another 10-15 minutes and then transfer the potato to a bowl and cut the 
entire thing up and season as you would a regular baked potato.  This is 
the ONLY way the kids will eat the potato skins!

============================

From: Kendall F. Stratton III 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 12:10:06 -0500
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote:
> I don't understand this greasing the outside of the baked potato thing--no
> one I know does it.  I'm wondering if it is a regional thing.  I started out
> in the mid-west and am now in the west.  Where are you folks that grease the
> outside of a potato before baking it?

I'm a Nor'Easter... (from the north-east) and I've never rubbed the baked
potatoes with oil.   I'd like to know why others do it too.   If it's
crispier skins 'ya want, bake 'em at high heat (450-F).   If it's moister
skins 'ya want, wrap 'em with foil and cook longer at a lower heat (350-F).

SIMPLE AS THAT -- WITHOUT THE FAT!!!

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 11:24:20 -0600
--------
K3 wrote:
> If it's crispier skins 'ya want, bake 'em at high heat (450-F).   If
> it's moister skins 'ya want, wrap 'em with foil and cook longer at a
> lower heat (350-F).
>
> SIMPLE AS THAT -- WITHOUT THE FAT!!!

With a potato, who's concerned about fat?!  Perhaps concerned with the carbs
if you are diabetic or on the Atkins diet.  But they aren't fat laden until
you add butter, sour cream, cheese, bacon, etc. to 'em.

Now stop and tell me you don't add butter or anything to your baked potato.
I'll believe you, Kendall ;-)

============================

From: Kendall F. Stratton III 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 12:58:14 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> With a potato, who's concerned about fat?!  Perhaps concerned with the carbs
> if you are diabetic or on the Atkins diet.  But they aren't fat laden until
> you add butter, sour cream, cheese, bacon, etc. to 'em.
>
> Now stop and tell me you don't add butter or anything to your baked potato.
> I'll believe you, Kendall ;-)

Carbs = 4 calories per gram
Protein = 4 calories per gram
Alcohol = 7 calores per gram
Fat = 9 calories per gram

You do the math!

I don't butter my 'taters often... I usually dice 'em, marinate 'em a
low-fat (or good fat like Olive Oil) marinade and brown 'em in the oven.
When eating whole baked potatoes, I usually slice 'em in half and top 'em
with fat-free salsa or whatever hot-sauce I'm in the mood for.

I've got 12 lbs to lose before May 11th... I'm standing 6'3" @ 232# today...
I'd like to hit 220# by then... my wife and I are going on a Caribbean
cruise for our 8th wedding anniversary.   I just hope that all this
war/terrorist related shit is over with by then!!!

============================

From: spacytracy 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 18:02:16 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> With a potato, who's concerned about fat?!  Perhaps concerned with the carbs
> if you are diabetic or on the Atkins diet.  But they aren't fat laden until
> you add butter, sour cream, cheese, bacon, etc. to 'em.

The original poster (and the subject line) referred to 'greasing outside of
baked potato'.  Are you stupid or just dumb?

============================

From: Kendall F. Stratton III 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 13:24:27 -0500
--------
spacytracy wrote:
> The original poster (and the subject line) referred to 'greasing outside of
> baked potato'.  Are you stupid or just dumb?

With a name like "SpacyTracy", I think you should ask yourself the same!!!
Are you stupid or just dumb???????????????

Jill was speaking of eating the whole potato (skins and all)... which I
always do... if one ain't gonna eat the skins, then why would anyone want to
waste their time/oil in greasing the skins??????

============================

From: spacytracy 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 18:32:18 GMT
--------
Kendall F. Stratton III wrote:
> With a name like "SpacyTracy", I think you should ask yourself the same!!!
> Are you stupid or just dumb???????????????

Hmmm, you judge me by a screen name, call me 'stupid', and 'dumb', then go
on to use a word that is not even a word in the English language.  Rock on,
moron.

============================

From: Kendall F. Stratton III 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 13:42:32 -0500
--------
spacytracy wrote:
> Hmmm, you judge me by a screen name, call me 'stupid', and 'dumb', then go
> on to use a word that is not even a word in the English language.  Rock on,
> moron.

Ain't ???

http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?ain%27t

Main Entry: ain't
Pronunciation: 'Ant
Etymology: contraction of are not
Date: 1778
1 : am not : are not : is not
2 : have not : has not
3 : do not : does not : did not -- used in some varieties of Black English
usage Although widely disapproved as nonstandard and more common in the
habitual speech of the less educated, ain't in senses 1 and 2 is flourishing
in American English. It is used in both speech and writing to catch
attention and to gain emphasis  . It is used especially in
journalistic prose as part of a consistently informal style . This informal ain't is commonly
distinguished from habitual ain't by its frequent occurrence in fixed
constructions and phrases   
  . In fiction ain't is used for purposes of characterization; in familiar
correspondence it tends to be the mark of a warm personal friendship. It is
also used for metrical reasons in popular songs  . Our evidence shows British use to be much the same as
American.

You're (your, yor, you is, yooze is) the Friggin
Moron!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Nothin' against 'ya personally yet, but when I sit her and listen to folks
diss'in others folks who contribute a lot to this newsgroup (whether
food-ralated or not)... I'z gets upset!!!

============================

From: spacytracy 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 18:45:38 GMT
--------
Kendall F. Stratton III wrote:
> Nothin' against 'ya personally yet, but when I sit her and listen to folks
> diss'in others folks who contribute a lot to this newsgroup (whether
> food-ralated or not)... I'z gets upset!!!

Heh, glad to see that you seem to center your life around Usenet.  Down,
Tiger.

============================

From: Kendall F. Stratton III 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 13:57:16 -0500
--------
spacytracy wrote:
> Heh, glad to see that you seem to center your life around Usenet.  Down,
> Tiger.

... you say that yet you're still here replying on USENET!!!!   What a
friggin' hypocrite!!!

============================

From: spacytracy 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 18:57:32 GMT
--------
Kendall F. Stratton III wrote:
> ... you say that yet you're still here replying on USENET!!!!   What a
> friggin' hypocrite!!!

Do you have a vein standing out on your forehead yet?

============================

From: Kendall F. Stratton III 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 14:17:26 -0500
--------
spacytracy wrote:
> Do you have a vein standing out on your forehead yet?

Nope... I'm ending my part of this thread right now... Too many important
things happening within the next few hours... The weather outside is
pretty-good... It just hit 40-degrees an hour ago...  I've got to pick my
son up from school (yup... a make-up snow day on Saturday... sucks!!!)... my
wife, my son and I are having dinner at our local sports-bar/restaurant
tonight... a Ricotta, Sausage, Onion and Pepper calzone for me... with sauce
on the side... and a Sam Adams in a frosty mug!!!   A side order of
Beer-Battered onion rings...  Mmmmm!!!    And I'm thinking that I'm gonna
lose those 12 lbs before our cruise!!!   LOL!!!

============================

From: zxcvbob 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 12:54:41 -0600
--------
K3 wrote:
> Ain't ???

"Gonna", perhaps?  Who cares.  This is an informal medium; ST or PVC or
whatever she's calling herself these days seems to be an idiot, and I
try not to be bothered with what idiots think.

Good luck getting ready for the cruise!  I need to lose the extra 10
pounds I put on every year between New Years and spring.  I've started
putting bacon grease or ham grease (!) on the outside of my potatoes
when I bake them, and then try not to add anything else but salt and
pepper.  Sometimes they still need a little cheese or something, but
usually I eat them dry. 

Nine calories per gram ain't so bad if there ain't many grams.

Best regards,
Bob

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 16:59:15 -0500
--------
K3 wrote:
> I'm a Nor'Easter... (from the north-east) and I've never rubbed the baked
> potatoes with oil.   I'd like to know why others do it too.   If it's
> crispier skins 'ya want, bake 'em at high heat (450-F).   If it's moister
> skins 'ya want, wrap 'em with foil and cook longer at a lower heat (350-F).
> 
> SIMPLE AS THAT -- WITHOUT THE FAT!!!

What's wrong with fat?  I wash them (scrub them up) and oil them up
with some vegetable oil.  Poke them with a fork and they go right on
the rack next to whatever I'm making them to go with.  If nothing
else, that 'whatever' would not appreciate being baked at 450.  I
don't usually heat the oven just for a couple of potatoes.  And I
like the crispier skin.  I eat them.  Childhood habit.  

============================

From: terraXOX[at]myrealbox.com (Terra)
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 22:07:54 GMT
--------
Using only crude tools and determination, Nancy Young wrote:
>   And I
> like the crispier skin.  I eat them.  Childhood habit.  

Hubby not only eats his own potato skin, he begs mine too... :-)

============================

From: Kendall F. Stratton III 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 07:42:17 -0500
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> What's wrong with fat?  I wash them (scrub them up) and oil them up
> with some vegetable oil.  Poke them with a fork and they go right on
> the rack next to whatever I'm making them to go with.  If nothing
> else, that 'whatever' would not appreciate being baked at 450.  I
> don't usually heat the oven just for a couple of potatoes.  And I
> like the crispier skin.  I eat them.  Childhood habit.

I wish you could just look at the "beer belly" and oversized "love handles"
that have... and I'm pretty sure it's from fat.   I ~love~ fried seafood,
well-marbled steaks, greasy garlic bread, etc...

I agree... nothin' wrong with fat when talking 'bout flavor... but "a moment
on the lips means forever on the hips".    I'm trying to survive on salads,
veggies, etc. (aka:  "Rabbit Food") for the next 8 weeks so that I can eat
as much as I want to on the cruise.   The food is what I'm looking forward
to the most... well, okay... the 2nd thing I'm looking forward to the most
on this ~romantic~ cruise!!!   ;-)

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 12:48:23 -0600
--------
K3 wrote:
> I agree... nothin' wrong with fat when talking 'bout flavor... but "a
> moment on the lips means forever on the hips".    I'm trying to
> survive on salads, veggies, etc. (aka:  "Rabbit Food") for the next 8
> weeks so that I can eat as much as I want to on the cruise.   The
> food is what I'm looking forward to the most... well, okay... the 2nd
> thing I'm looking forward to the most on this ~romantic~ cruise!!!

Kendall, start hunting early for the fiddleheads.  Yeah, I know they aren't
sprouting yet, but the walk will do you good!  Look for truffles while
you're out there.  Take along a pig if you need to.  (giggling)

============================

From: connieg999[at]aol.com (ConnieG999)
Date: 24 Mar 2003 00:32:30 GMT
--------
Kendall F. Stratton III writes:
>I wish you could just look at the "beer belly" and oversized "love handles"
>that have... and I'm pretty sure it's from fat

Strangely enough, evidence seems to be getting stronger that carbohydrates may
indeed be the culprit...
Although of course calories will always count. 

============================

From: blacksalt 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 19:17:37 -0800
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote:
> I don't understand this greasing the outside of the baked potato thing--no
> one I know does it.  I'm wondering if it is a regional thing.  I started out
> in the mid-west and am now in the west.  Where are you folks that grease the
> outside of a potato before baking it?

In the land of The Joy Of Cooking.
blacksalt
which I hear and obey

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 11:48:34 -0500
--------
blacksalt wrote:
>In the land of The Joy Of Cooking.
>blacksalt
>which I hear and obey

irma ususally has her reasons.  she does condone boiling blue crabs,
though.  i guess no one is perfect.

============================

From: terraXOX[at]myrealbox.com (Terra)
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 18:24:20 GMT
--------
Using only crude tools and determination, Janet Bostwick wrote:

> I don't understand this greasing the outside of the baked potato thing--no
> one I know does it.  I'm wondering if it is a regional thing.  I started out
> in the mid-west and am now in the west.  Where are you folks that grease the
> outside of a potato before baking it?

My mother always rubbed shortening on her spuds -- she grew up 
here in Western Washington. Hubby is from the East Coast and he 
got me to stop putting the grease on. I like them better just 
scrubbed, poked, and baked anyway...

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 22 Mar 2003 19:29:27 GMT
--------
Janet Bostwick writes:
>I don't understand this greasing the outside of the baked potato thing--no
>one I know does it.  I'm wondering if it is a regional thing.  I started out
>in the mid-west and am now in the west.  Where are you folks that grease the
>outside of a potato before baking it?
>Janet

In South Brooklyn ya just wrap dem spuds inna few layers old newpaper and toss
em inna fire, no washing, no oiling, no nuttin... aintcha ebber eat a mickie?

============================

From: Dimitri 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 23:28:09 GMT
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> In South Brooklyn ya just wrap dem spuds inna few layers old newpaper and toss
> em inna fire, no washing, no oiling, no nuttin... aintcha ebber eat a mickie?

What could be better that fresh "Brooklyn Borrowed" corn on the cob, fresh
dug cherrystone clams, mickies and a slice of watermelon off the truck
'cause they're too ripe to go to market.

Tabasco & lemon for the clams and  butter for the mickies & corn.  A feast
at the beach.........

============================

From: Janet Bostwick 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 19:42:01 -0700
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> In South Brooklyn ya just wrap dem spuds inna few layers old newpaper and toss
> em inna fire, no washing, no oiling, no nuttin... aintcha ebber eat a mickie?

I don't understand the reference to 'mickie.'  How did that term come about?

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 05:54:01 -0500
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote:
>I don't understand the reference to 'mickie.'  How did that term come about?

i had always assumed it was derived from 'mick,' a derogatory term for
an irishman, due to the irish people's association with potatoes.
damn if i can find anything to back it up, though.

your pal,
murph

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 23 Mar 2003 13:32:48 GMT
--------
Janet Bostwick writes:
>I don't understand the reference to 'mickie.'  How did that term come about?

Mickie is an endearing term for an Irishman.

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 10:06:23 -0600
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Mickie is an endearing term for an Irishman.

Oh right.  And Hunkies, Degos and Wops are also terms of endearment.
(laughing)

I ate half of the other loaded baked potato for breakfast.  And yes, I
rubbed the skins with butter and sprinkled salt on generously before baking.

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 11:46:28 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>Oh right.  And Hunkies, Degos and Wops are also terms of endearment.

i think my favorite term of derogation is 'garlic eater,' which of
course is somewhat out of fashion now.  if i recall correctly, this
was a term new england wasps used to refer to swarthy mediterranean
types.

as a term applied to irishmen, i've only heard 'mick,' never
'mickies.'

============================

From: ElaineFromDrake[at]webtv.net (Elaine Goldberg)
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 12:39:00 -0700 (MST)
--------
Janet wrote:
> I don't understand this greasing the
> outside of the baked potato thing--no
> one I know does it. I'm wondering if it is
> a regional thing. I started out in the
> mid-west and am now in the west.
> Where are you folks that grease the
> outside of a potato before baking it?

I started out in the mid-west (Iowa) and ended up in Colorado.  My
family has always greased the outside of the potato before baking.

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 18:15:16 -0500
--------
Elaine Goldberg wrote:
>I started out in the mid-west (Iowa) and ended up in Colorado.  My
>family has always greased the outside of the potato before baking.

i'll rub 'em with olive oil.  probably learned from 'joy of cooking'
rather than at mother's knee, though.

============================

From: Gabby 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 17:14:57 -0400
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> i'll rub 'em with olive oil.  probably learned from 'joy of cooking'
> rather than at mother's knee, though.

Betty Crocker taught me, but after I tried it I went back to scrub, poke and
bake.  Forget the oil.

============================

From: judithrichards[at]webtv.net (JUDITH RICHARDS)
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 15:53:48 -0600 (CST)
--------
Hi i,m Judi first time to post with this groul.I have been married 39
years and have always rubbed olive oil on a potato before baking.  Makes
tht skin nice for eating.  Sometimes I shake parmesancheese on before
baking.  I was raised in California and now live in Iowa.  But my mom
taught me about the baked potato.

============================

From: Lorin 
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 10:09:01 -0700
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote:
> I don't understand this greasing the outside of the baked potato thing--no
> one I know does it.  I'm wondering if it is a regional thing.  I started out
> in the mid-west and am now in the west.  Where are you folks that grease the
> outside of a potato before baking it?

Depending on what's going on I do it both ways.......sometimes I put the
potato in a plastic bag with vegetables and meat for the grill and let
it soak in the marinade, pat it dry and coat it with oil and bake it
with indirect heat, works in the smoker too.....out west, Colorado
here.     Lorin

============================

From: Chris and Bob Neidecker 
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 20:06:06 -0500
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote:
> I don't understand this greasing the outside of the baked potato thing--no
> one I know does it.  I'm wondering if it is a regional thing.  I started out
> in the mid-west and am now in the west.  Where are you folks that grease the
> outside of a potato before baking it?

I grew up in the Northeast USA, and was taught to wash, dry, poke and bake.
Skins always came out crispy.  To eat, you'd cut the potato, squeeze/push it
open, fluff up the innards a bit with your fork, add whatever
seasonings/condiments/naughty stuff you please, and eat the insides.  Then,
once you were down to the skin, you'd cut it in half, add butter and more
salt and pepper to the scooped out part, and eat.

Sometimes, though, my mom would make the potatoes this way.  Wash and dry.
Cut potatoes in half the long way, such that you have the flattest halves
possible.  Dry the cut sides.  Spread cut sides with butter, sprinkle with
salt & pepper.  Place cut side down on baking sheet, bake at 400F or so
(flexible) for 30-40 minutes, or til tender when pierced with a fork (that
time & temp works for moderate-sized baking potatoes, not those mammoth ones
you see these days).  The skinds come out crispy and the cut side is browned
and tasty.  You eat these with your fingers, skins and all...you can
slit the cut side and add more butter and salt if you want.  My kids won't
eat baked potatoes, but they'll eat Grandma Betty's potatoes any day of the
week....including the skins.

============================

Subject: Re: greasing outside of baked potato? ~Tennessee~
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: debgunter[at]webtv.net (Deb)
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 09:18:29 -0600 (CST)
--------
I'm from Tennessee and I have always rubbed the outside of a washed and
dried potato with alittle bacon grease then after making a hole in the
potato I wrap it with wax paper and put in microwave.. the wax paper
helps cook it faster
and the potato is evenly done and fluffy..and gives the skin a great
taste.... ~Deb~

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 12:07:05 -0600
--------
Deb wrote:
> I'm from Tennessee and I have always rubbed the outside of a washed
> and dried potato with alittle bacon grease then after making a hole
> in the potato I wrap it with wax paper and put in microwave.. the wax
> paper helps cook it faster
> and the potato is evenly done and fluffy..and gives the skin a great
> taste.... ~Deb~

Ugh.  Microwaved potatoes.  We won't go there.

Jill (also in Tennessee)

============================

From: PussywillowTn[at]webtv.net
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 13:30:16 -0600 (CST)
--------
I never had a baked potato with a greased skin until I had one in a
restaurant.  have to agree with the other poster who said it was not a
fluffy potato and yes, mine was greasy also.

As for microwave potatoes, don't' turn up your nose until you've had one
properly nuked.  If prepared correctly, you can't tell the difference in
one zapped in the microwave or one incinerated in the oven.  It's all in
the technique.  And yes, they come out light, fluffy, and they burst
when squeezed.

The only way I would waste that much energy, whether it be gas or
electricity, on a baked potato is if I were preparing a panful of spuds
for a crowd.  I would never turn on the oven for one or two measly
little 'taters'.  Right off the bat, I can't think of anything that
bakes in the oven at 450 except potatoes.

============================

From: Janet Bostwick 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 13:28:19 -0700
--------
PussywillowTn wrote:
> The only way I would waste that much energy, whether it be gas or
> electricity, on a baked potato is if I were preparing a panful of spuds
> for a crowd.  I would never turn on the oven for one or two measly
> little 'taters'.  Right off the bat, I can't think of anything that
> bakes in the oven at 450 except potatoes.

My mom only baked potatoes when we were having something else for dinner
done in the oven or if the oven was already hot from something else.  She
did hers at 350F along with whatever--if need be, she would start the
potatoes first and let them finish with whatever else needed to be in the
oven.  The longer baking(if using 350F) still produces a crisp skin.  I
still follow that practice and have oven meals.  A favorite for Fall is
chicken, squash, baked potatoes and apple pie.  Wintertime use is  bread,
followed by brownies, meatloaf and baked potatoes.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 23 Mar 2003 20:40:51 GMT
--------
Janet Bostwick writes:
>As for microwave potatoes, don't' turn up your nose until you've had one
>properly nuked.  If prepared correctly, you can't tell the difference

YOU can't tell the difference, YOU have your taste in your ass.

============================

From: Gabby 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 17:12:24 -0400
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> YOU can't tell the difference, YOU have your taste in your ass.

Gee, I agree with you.  Although I probably wouldn't have put it quite that
way.  ;o)

============================

From: Janet Bostwick 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 15:02:21 -0700
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> YOU can't tell the difference, YOU have your taste in your ass.

You may be right about me--however, give credit where credit is due--I
didn't post the above comment.

============================

From: zxcvbob 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 15:09:45 -0600
--------
PussywillowTn wrote:
> The only way I would waste that much energy, whether it be gas or
> electricity, on a baked potato is if I were preparing a panful of spuds
> for a crowd.  I would never turn on the oven for one or two measly
> little 'taters'.  Right off the bat, I can't think of anything that
> bakes in the oven at 450 except potatoes.

1) Running the oven in the winter helps heat your house.  It is very
energy efficient if you have a gas stove.  It's not that bad if you have
electric.

2) Pizza bakes at 450, and some folks cook baking powder biscuits that
high.

Regards,
Bob

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 16:20:14 -0600
--------
PussywillowTn wrote:

> As for microwave potatoes, don't' turn up your nose until you've had one
> properly nuked.  If prepared correctly, you can't tell the difference in
> one zapped in the microwave or one incinerated in the oven.  It's all in
> the technique.  And yes, they come out light, fluffy, and they burst
> when squeezed.

> I've tried microwaving baking potatoes and believe me, you can tell
> the difference.  They are cooked, yeah.  Steamed is more like it.  It
> is definitely not the same as an oven roasted (baked) potato.

The only thing I use my microwave for is heating frozen veggies or zapping
a hot dog.  Maybe heating canned soup.  It's pretty much a useless appliance
and I'm considering giving it up completely because I could use the counter
space.

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 13:51:09 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> The only thing I use my microwave for is heating frozen veggies or zapping
>a hot dog.  Maybe heating canned soup.  It's pretty much a useless appliance
>and I'm considering giving it up completely because I could use the counter
>space.

why only canned soup, jill?  i find the microwave useful for reheating
chinese food, because the vegetables retain most of their crispness.
i'll also zap sliced pastrami or corned beef to get a 'grilled'
effect.

============================

From: Pat Meadows 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 22:50:07 GMT
--------
PussywillowTn wrote:
>As for microwave potatoes, don't' turn up your nose until you've had one
>properly nuked.  If prepared correctly, you can't tell the difference in
>one zapped in the microwave or one incinerated in the oven.  It's all in
>the technique.  And yes, they come out light, fluffy, and they burst
>when squeezed.

I can certainly tell the difference between a microwaved
potato and a baked potato.  Maybe I'm not microwaving them
in the correct manner.

Could you tell me how to cook them in the microwave so that
they come out as good as they do in the oven?

============================

From: Sally Wallace 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 23:13:45 GMT
--------
PussywillowTn wrote in
>  Right off the bat, I can't think of anything
> that bakes in the oven at 450 except potatoes.

Living in Nashville and you've never had cornbread? It cooks at 450, as do 
biscuits.


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